Registrations are now open. Join us today!
There is still a lot of work to do on the wiki yet! More information about editing can be found here.
Already have an account?

Microsoft KB Archive/107161

From BetaArchive Wiki

Stacker Conversion: ScanDisk Repeatedly Says Run CHECK /F PSS ID Number: Q107161 Article last modified on 11-16-1993 PSS database name: O_MSDOS

6.20

MS-DOS

The information in this article applies to:
- Microsoft MS-DOS operating system version 6.2

SYMPTOMS

When you run the MS-DOS 6.2 DoubleSpace Stacker-compressed drive conversion routine, you may encounter a loop in which SCANDISK /CHECKONLY detects a physical error on the hard disk drive and recommends you run CHECK /F (a Stacker program). Since CHECK cannot fix physical errors, the next time you run the conversion routine, SCANDISK /CHECKONLY generates the same error.

NOTE: If you are using Stacker version 2.x, the Stacker conversion routine calls SCHECK /F instead of CHECK /F. Both are Stacker program files.

CAUSE

This situation occurs only if a physical sector on your hard disk drive is unreadable.

RESOLUTION

To work around this problem, use ScanDisk to mark the unreadable sector as bad (unusable) and attempt to recover any lost data.

WARNING: Before you run ScanDisk to repair the physical drive, back up your program and data files. Although data may already be lost, you should make a backup in case CHECK is unable to correctly read and repair the SVF after the bad sector is marked as unusable.

To do this:

  1. Copy SCANDISK.EXE to the host drive.
  2. Unmount the Stacker-compressed drive.
  3. Run ScanDisk. For example, type “scandisk c: /surface” (without the quotation marks) at the MS-DOS command prompt and then press ENTER.
  4. Remount your Stacker-compressed drive.
  5. Run CHECK (or CHECK /F if necessary) to repair and correct any problems in your Stacker-compressed drive.

You should now be able to successfully run the Stacker conversion routine.

Additional reference words: 6.20 bad

Copyright Microsoft Corporation 1993.