Microsoft KB Archive/37898

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Bibliography Reference for QuickBasic: Graphics, Tutorials

Article ID: 37898

Article Last Modified on 8/16/2005



APPLIES TO

  • Microsoft QuickBasic 4.0
  • Microsoft QuickBASIC 4.0b
  • Microsoft QuickBasic 4.5 for MS-DOS
  • Microsoft QuickBASIC for MS-DOS 5.0
  • Microsoft BASIC Compiler 6.0
  • Microsoft BASIC Compiler 6.0b
  • Microsoft BASIC Professional Development System 7.0
  • Microsoft BASIC Professional Development System 7.1
  • Microsoft GW-BASIC 3.2
  • Microsoft GW-BASIC 3.22
  • Microsoft GW-BASIC 3.23



This article was previously published under Q37898

SUMMARY

This article summarizes selected textbooks from Microsoft Press and other sources that are useful references for Basic programmers. This information applies to QuickBasic versions 1.0, 1.01, 1.02, 2.0, 2.01, 3.0, 4.0, 4.0b, and 4.5 for MS-DOS; Microsoft Basic Compiler versions 6.0 and 6.0b for MS-DOS and MS OS/2; and Microsoft Basic Professional Development System (PDS) versions 7.0 and 7.1 for MS-DOS and MS OS/2. Some references also apply to Microsoft GW-Basic Interpreter versions 3.2, 3.22, and 3.23 for MS-DOS, and to the BasicA Interpreter sold by IBM, Compaq, and other companies.

MORE INFORMATION

The following book applies to Microsoft Basic PDS 7.0 and 7.1:

  • "Microsoft Basic 7.1: A Programmer's Reference" by Peter G. Aitken, published by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. (1991)


Describes Basic PDS programming techniques, graphics, the User Interface Toolbox, Add-on Libraries, error and event handling, ISAM, OS/2 programming. (418 pages)

The following Microsoft Press books apply specifically to QuickBasic for MS-DOS (for IBM Personal Computers and compatibles):

  • "Microsoft QuickBasic Programmer's Toolbox" by John Clark Craig, published by Microsoft Press (1988)


Contains more than 250 subprograms and functions that address common and unusual programming tasks, including the following:

    • ANSI.SYS screen control
    • Mouse support
    • Pop-up windows
    • Graphics
    • String and bit manipulations
    • Editing routines
    • Engineering, mathematical, statistical, and random-number functions
    • Calendar and time routines
    • Demonstrations and useful routines written in Microsoft C (This book shows how to write and compile C routines and how to create a Quick library from those routines.)
  • "Microsoft QuickBasic," third edition by Douglas Hergert, published by Microsoft Press (1989)


This is the best resource for programming with QuickBasic version 4.5 for IBM PC compatibles, and contains the material from the Second edition (below) updated for version 4.5.

  • "Microsoft QuickBasic," second edition by Douglas Hergert, published by Microsoft Press (1988)


This is the best resource for programming with QuickBasic version 4.0 for IBM PC compatibles. It provides a concise survey of the new features of QuickBasic 4.0. Special emphasis is placed on the editing environment, record structures, user-defined TYPEs, constants, additional loop and decision structures, and recursion. There are six programs to help illustrate QuickBasic commands, functions, and techniques.

  • "Microsoft QuickBasic" by Douglas Hergert, published by Microsoft Press (1987)


This book provides a good introduction to QuickBasic versions 2.0, 2.01, and 3.0 for IBM PC compatibles. It covers modular programming, subroutines, include files, and general programming practices.

  • "Microsoft QuickBasic: Programmer's Quick Reference" by Kris Jamsa, published by Microsoft Press (1989)


For every Microsoft QuickBasic statement and function, this quick reference contains a brief description, complete syntax, details on parameters, and usually a sample program fragment.

  • "Learn Basic Now" by Halvorson and Rygmyr, published by Microsoft Press (1990)


This book includes the QuickBasic interpreter (QBI.EXE) on disk, and provides excellent step-by-step instructions for learning Basic programming.

  • "The Waite Group's Microsoft QuickBasic Bible" by Mitchell Waite, published by Microsoft Press (1990)


This is the definitive reference for Microsoft QuickBasic versions through 4.5 for both novice and professional programmers (940 pages). Because the 4.5 product's language reference is mostly in the online Help, you may want a printed reference such as this.

The following books are from non-Microsoft publishers:

  • "QuickBasic Made Easy" by Albrecht, Wiegand, and Brown; published by Osborne McGraw-Hill (1989)


This is a programming textbook. A teacher's guide and a series of workbooks are also available.

  • "Advanced QuickBasic 4.0" by Murray Lesser, from Bantam Books (1988)


This book describes building assembly-language libraries for use with QuickBasic.

  • "Using QB" by Inman and Albrecht, from McGraw-Hill


This book is a good tutorial for QuickBasic 4.0.

  • "Using QuickBasic 4.0" by Feldman and Rugg, from Que


This is both a tutorial and reference and is one of the most complete books on QuickBasic 4.0.

  • "Microsoft QuickBasic Using Modular Structure" by Julia Case Bradley, from William C. Brown Publishers (1989)


This is a programming textbook. A study guide is available.

  • "Microsoft IBM QuickBasic: A Structured Approach" by Harvey and Paul Deitel, published by Prentice-Hall (1989)


This is a programming textbook.

  • "QuickBasic: A Structured Programming Approach" by Fred Scott, published by Scott, Foresman, and Company (1988)


This is a programming textbook.

  • "Structured Basic Programming" second edition by Harry Moriber, Merrill Publishing (1989)


This is a programming textbook. Only the appendix discusses Microsoft QuickBasic.

  • "Advanced Structured Basic" by Lloyd Onyett, published by DC Heath (1989)


This is a programming textbook. Only the appendix discusses Microsoft QuickBasic.

  • "Microsoft QuickBasic Programmer's Reference" by Douglas Hergert, published by Howard W. Sams & Company (1990)


A comprehensive treatment of all 200 commands and functions in QuickBasic 4.5.

The following book applies to general Microsoft Basic:

"Basic Computer Adventures"
by David Ahl, published by Microsoft Press (1986)

This book contains 10 sample programs (games) to demonstrate general concepts of Basic programming. All of the programs in this book are written in standard Microsoft Basic for IBM PC compatibles (including Microsoft GW-Basic, IBM BasicA, and COMPAQ BasicA). The programs also work in Microsoft Basic for the Apple Macintosh.

The following newsletter applies to GW-Basic and BasicA:

"The Basic Teacher"
2814 19th Street
San Francisco, CA 94110

This monthly newsletter discusses learning and teaching Basic. Each issue contains tutorials, problems, solutions, and reviews. The newsletter material is written by the authors of the following book:

"GW-Basic Made Easy"
by Bob Albrecht and Don Inman, published by Osborne McGraw-Hill (1989)

The books below deal with advanced programming.

The following books do not describe Basic language programming; they describe video modes and BIOS and MS-DOS interrupt calls accessible from QuickBasic 2.0, 2.01, 3.0, 4.0, 4.0b, and 4.5:

  • "Programmer's Guide to PC & PS/2 Video Systems" by Richard Wilton, published by Microsoft Press (1987)

    This book gives excellent, in-depth coverage of IBM PC and PS/2 video systems, including the following:

    • MDA (monochrome display adapter)
    • CGA (color graphics adapter)
    • EGA (enhanced graphics adapter)
    • VGA (video graphics array; the video subsystem integrated into the IBM PS/2 Models 50, 60, and 80)
    • HGA (Hercules Graphics Adapter)
    • MCGA (multicolor graphics array or memory controller gate array; the video subsystem integrated into the IBM PS/2 Model 30)
    This book also includes many invaluable C and assembler source-code examples. Whatever graphic output you want, (for example, text, circles, region fill, alphanumeric character sets, bit blocks, or animation), you can do it faster and more effectively with this book.
  • "Advanced MS-DOS Programming," second edition by Ray Duncan, published by Microsoft Press (1988)

    (The first edition, published in 1986, was called "Advanced MS-DOS" and covers only MS-DOS versions 1.0 through 3.0.)

    The second edition discusses MS-DOS versions 1.0 through 4.0 in-depth. This book emphasizes the following subjects:

    • MS-DOS disk file and record operations
    • MS-DOS disk directories and volume labels
    • MS-DOS memory management
    • MS-DOS EXEC functions
    • MS-DOS programming reference (interrupts and function calls)
    • IBM ROM BIOS functions (up to IBM PS/2 Model 80 ROM BIOS, and VGA video adapter)
    • Microsoft Mouse driver functions reference (up to Microsoft Mouse driver version 6.0). This was not included in the first edition of "Advanced MS-DOS."
    • Lotus/Intel/Microsoft (LIM) Expanded Memory Specification (EMS) functions reference (up through LIM EMS version 4.0). This was not included in the first edition of "Advanced MS-DOS."
  • "The New Peter Norton Programmer's Guide to the IBM PC and PS/2: the Ultimate Reference Guide to the Entire Family of IBM Personal Computers" by Peter Norton and Richard Wilton, published by Microsoft Press (1988)
  • "The Peter Norton Programmer's Guide to the IBM PC" by Peter Norton, published by Microsoft Press (1985)

    This book covers the following subjects:

    • Disk-handling information
    • Sound generation
    • BIOS (basic input/output system) information
    • ROM BIOS video and disk services
    • MS-DOS interrupts and function calls
    • Installable device drivers
    • Tips on creating interface routines for higher languages
  • "Microsoft Mouse Programmer's Reference" by Microsoft Press (1989)

    This guide describes how to perform Microsoft Mouse function calls from Microsoft QuickBasic, interpreted Basic, QuickC, C, Pascal, Macro Assembler, and FORTRAN. Two 5.25-inch companion disks include sample programs.
  • "MS-DOS Extensions: Programmer's Quick Reference" by Ray Duncan, published by Microsoft Press (1989)

    This is a concise reference for Lotus/Intel/Microsoft Expanded Memory Specification (LIM EMS) version 4.0, LIM Extended Memory Specification (LIM XMS) version 2.0, Microsoft CD-ROM Extensions version 2.1, and Microsoft mouse driver function calls.

The following magazine is the first magazine dedicated to programming in Basic. It covers programming tips, products, and articles related to the Basic programming community.

"The QuickBasic Journal"
Northeast Publishing
126 Wellington Ave.
Warwick, RI 02886
(401) 274-5492



Additional query words: QuickBas BasicCom 1.00 2.00 2.10 3.00 4.00 4.00b 4.50 6.00 6.00b 7.00 7.10

Keywords: KB37898