Difference between revisions of "Microsoft KB Archive/108149"

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The FindFirst, FindLast, FindNext, and FindPrevious methods locate the first, last, next, or previous record, respectively, that satisfies the specified criteria and makes that record the current record. These methods are referred to as the find methods and have the following syntax:<br />
 
The FindFirst, FindLast, FindNext, and FindPrevious methods locate the first, last, next, or previous record, respectively, that satisfies the specified criteria and makes that record the current record. These methods are referred to as the find methods and have the following syntax:<br />
  
<pre class="fixed_text">  <recordset&gt;.FindFirst <criteria&gt;
+
<pre class="fixed_text">  <recordset>.FindFirst <criteria>
  
   where <recordset&gt; and <criteria&gt; are defined as follows:
+
   where <recordset> and <criteria> are defined as follows:
  
       <recordset&gt; is the Recordset property of a data control or an object
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       <recordset> is the Recordset property of a data control or an object
 
       variable identifying a Dynaset or Snapshot.
 
       variable identifying a Dynaset or Snapshot.
  
       <criteria&gt; is a string expression specifying the records that you
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       <criteria> is a string expression specifying the records that you
 
       want. The string is the WHERE clause in an SQL string without the
 
       want. The string is the WHERE clause in an SQL string without the
 
       word WHERE.
 
       word WHERE.
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The Seek method locates a record that meets the specified criteria for the current index in an indexed table and makes it the current record. The Seek method has the following syntax:<br />
 
The Seek method locates a record that meets the specified criteria for the current index in an indexed table and makes it the current record. The Seek method has the following syntax:<br />
  
<pre class="fixed_text">  <table&gt;.Seek <comparison&gt;, <key1&gt;, <key2&gt;, ...
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<pre class="fixed_text">  <table>.Seek <comparison>, <key1>, <key2>, ...
  
 
   where the arguments are defined as follows:
 
   where the arguments are defined as follows:
  
       <comparison&gt;         is one of the following string expressions:
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       <comparison>         is one of the following string expressions:
                             <, <=, =, &gt;=, &gt;, or <&gt;
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                             <, <=, =, >=, >, or <>
  
       <key1&gt;, <key2&gt;, ...  one value for each field in the table's current
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       <key1>, <key2>, ...  one value for each field in the table's current
 
                             index.
 
                             index.
 
                 </pre>
 
                 </pre>
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You must set the current index with the Index property before you use Seek. If the index identifies a non-unique-key field, Seek locates the first record satisfying the criteria.<br />
 
You must set the current index with the Index property before you use Seek. If the index identifies a non-unique-key field, Seek locates the first record satisfying the criteria.<br />
 
<br />
 
<br />
When the comparison is =, &gt;=, &gt;, or <&gt;, Seek starts at the beginning of the index and searches forward. When the comparison is <= or <, Seek starts at the end of the index and searches backward.<br />
+
When the comparison is =, >=, >, or <>, Seek starts at the beginning of the index and searches forward. When the comparison is <= or <, Seek starts at the end of the index and searches backward.<br />
 
<br />
 
<br />
If <table&gt; doesn't refer to an open table, or if there is no current index, an error occurs.<br />
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If <table> doesn't refer to an open table, or if there is no current index, an error occurs.<br />
 
<br />
 
<br />
 
Always inspect the value of the NoMatch property of the recordset to determine whether each Seek method has succeeded. If Seek fails, NoMatch is True and the current record is unchanged.<br />
 
Always inspect the value of the NoMatch property of the recordset to determine whether each Seek method has succeeded. If Seek fails, NoMatch is True and the current record is unchanged.<br />

Latest revision as of 16:45, 20 July 2020

Article ID: 108149

Article Last Modified on 10/20/2003



APPLIES TO

  • Microsoft Visual Basic 3.0 Professional Edition



This article was previously published under Q108149

SUMMARY

This article compares the Seek method to the find methods (FindFirst, FindLast, FindNext, and FindPrevious) for data access in Visual Basic.

MORE INFORMATION

The Seek and find methods differ in performance and in the type of recordsets to which they apply:

  • The find methods (FindFirst, FindLast, FindNext, and FindPrevious) apply to Dynasets and Snapshots but not to Table objects. Conversely, the Seek method is available only on the Table object.
  • The Seek method is significantly faster than the find methods. It is also more flexible because you can change the Index property of the Table object to change the order of the Seek. For intensive searches, you may want to create a Table object so that you can use the Seek method along with the find methods on the open Dynasets.

FindFirst, FindLast, FindNext, FindPrevious Methods

The FindFirst, FindLast, FindNext, and FindPrevious methods locate the first, last, next, or previous record, respectively, that satisfies the specified criteria and makes that record the current record. These methods are referred to as the find methods and have the following syntax:

   <recordset>.FindFirst <criteria>

   where <recordset> and <criteria> are defined as follows:

      <recordset> is the Recordset property of a data control or an object
      variable identifying a Dynaset or Snapshot.

      <criteria> is a string expression specifying the records that you
      want. The string is the WHERE clause in an SQL string without the
      word WHERE.
                


If the recordset contains more than one record that matches the criteria, FindFirst locates the first occurrence, FindNext locates the next occurrence, and so on. You can follow a find method with a move method, such as MoveNext, which moves to the next record regardless of whether it matches any criteria. If no matching records are found, the NoMatch property is True and the current record remains the same as it was before the find method was used.

NOTE: With a data control, if an Edit or AddNew operation is pending when you use one of the find or move methods, the Update method is automatically invoked if not intercepted during the Validate event.

CAUTION: In the Professional Edition of Visual Basic, if you are not using a data control and use one of the find or move methods while an Edit or AddNew method is pending, any existing changes will be lost and no error will occur. An Edit or AddNew will be pending until an Update occurs. For more information, see the Update method in the Help menu.

Example Code for FindFirst Method

The following example creates a Dynaset, and then uses FindFirst to locate the first record satisfying the title condition:

   Sub Form_Load ()
      Dim MyCriteria As String, MyDB As Database, MySet As Dynaset
      MyCriteria = "State = 'NY'"    ' Define search criteria.
      Set MyDB = OpenDatabase("BIBLIO.MDB")
      ' Create a Dynaset based on the Publishers table:
      Set MySet = MyDB.CreateDynaset("Publishers")

      ' Find first matching record:
      MySet.FindFirst MyCriteria
      If Not MySet.NoMatch Then
         MsgBox "match was found"
      Else
         MsgBox "match was not found"
      End If  ' For a data control, you can use Data1.Recordset.NoMatch

      ' Find next matching record:
      MySet.FindNext MyCriteria
      If Not MySet.NoMatch Then
         MsgBox "match was found"
      Else
         MsgBox "match was not found"
      End If
   End Sub
                


Seek Method

The Seek method locates a record that meets the specified criteria for the current index in an indexed table and makes it the current record. The Seek method has the following syntax:

   <table>.Seek <comparison>, <key1>, <key2>, ...

   where the arguments are defined as follows:

      <comparison>          is one of the following string expressions:
                            <, <=, =, >=, >, or <>

      <key1>, <key2>, ...   one value for each field in the table's current
                            index.
                


To use the Seek method, you must first use the OpenTable method to create an object variable for the table.

Seek searches through the specified Table using the current index and locates the first record satisfying the criteria specified by comparison and the key values (key1, key2...) and makes it the current record.

You must set the current index with the Index property before you use Seek. If the index identifies a non-unique-key field, Seek locates the first record satisfying the criteria.

When the comparison is =, >=, >, or <>, Seek starts at the beginning of the index and searches forward. When the comparison is <= or <, Seek starts at the end of the index and searches backward.

If doesn't refer to an open table, or if there is no current index, an error occurs.

Always inspect the value of the NoMatch property of the recordset to determine whether each Seek method has succeeded. If Seek fails, NoMatch is True and the current record is unchanged.

Example Code for Seek Method

The following example uses Seek to locate the first record in the Publishers table where the PubID field is 3, using the existing primary key index:

   Sub Form_Load ()
      Dim MyDB As database, MyTable As table
      Set MyDB = OpenDatabase("BIBLIO.MDB")      ' Open a database.
      Set MyTable = MyDB.OpenTable("Publishers") ' Open a table.
      MyTable.Index = "PrimaryKey"               ' Define current index.
      MyTable.Seek "=", 3                        ' Seek record.
      If MyTable.NoMatch Then
         MsgBox "match was not found"
      Else
         MsgBox "match was found"
      End If
   End Sub
                

REFERENCES

For more information, please read the Visual Basic online Help for the Seek, FindFirst, FindLast, FindNext, and FindPrevious Methods.

You can study the database design of a database file such as BIBLIO.MDB by opening it with Microsoft Access, or with the Data Manager or VISDATA provided with Visual Basic.

You can run the Data Manager program from the Window menu in Visual Basic, or from the Windows File Manager run DATAMGR.EXE in the Visual Basic directory.

The VISDATA.MAK file installed in the VB3\SAMPLES\VISDATA directory loads extensive examples of data access. The VISDATA sample program uses every data access function in Visual Basic. You can refer to the VISDATA source code for examples of how to use each data access function.


Additional query words: 3.00 MoveFirst MoveLast MoveNext MovePrevious

Keywords: KB108149