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Microsoft KB Archive/168830

From BetaArchive Wiki

Article ID: 168830

Article Last Modified on 6/29/2004



APPLIES TO

  • Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0 Learning Edition
  • Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0 Professional Edition
  • Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0 Enterprise Edition
  • Microsoft Visual Basic 5.0 Control Creation Edition
  • Microsoft Visual Basic 5.0 Learning Edition
  • Microsoft Visual Basic 5.0 Professional Edition
  • Microsoft Visual Basic 5.0 Enterprise Edition



This article was previously published under Q168830

SUMMARY

When using an object that has multiple interfaces, you may be faced with assigning it to multiple variables of different object types to get at relevant interfaces. This is made more difficult by having to keep track of the different variables and clean them up properly. This article gives code for a simple function to allow casting an object to a different interface without the need to create additional object variables or keep track of them.

MORE INFORMATION

The sample code below illustrates a common problem when utilizing objects that have multiple interfaces:

   Dim Shape As IShape, C As ICircle, S As ISquare
   Set C = New ICircle
   Set Shape = C
   Shape.SetXY 100, 100
   C.Radius = 50
   Shape.Draw Me
   Set C = Nothing
   Set S = New ISquare
   Set Shape = S            ' Critical line
   Shape.SetXY 300, 200
   S.Side = 50
   Shape.Draw Me
   Set Shape = Nothing
   Set S = Nothing
                

If you forget to set the Shape object to S on the "Critical line," you will still be manipulating the Circle object in subsequent code. In addition, it's difficult to tell you are using the Shape object to get at additional interfaces or what object it's currently set to.

To clear up this problem, create global functions in your application to cast the variables to their alternate interfaces. The example above requires only one function to cast to the IShape interface:

   Function IShape(oShape As IShape) As IShape
     Set IShape = oShape
   End Function
                

You can then reference this function to perform the casting:

   IShape(C).SetXY 100, 100
   C.Radius = 50
   IShape(C).Draw Me
                

Or more efficiently:

   With IShape(C)
     .SetXY 100, 100
     C.Radius = 50
     .Draw Me
   End With
                

You no longer have to define, set, or otherwise keep track of additional variables for casting purposes. Giving the function the same name as the interface helps with program clarity.

Step-by Step Example

  1. Create a new project with the following objects:

       Type            Name
       ---------------------------
       Class Module    IShape
       Class Module    ICircle
       Class Module    ISquare
       Form            Form1
                            
  2. Type the following code in the IShape Class Module:

          Option Explicit
    
          Public Sub SetXY(ByVal NewX As Long, ByVal NewY As Long)
          End Sub
    
          Public Sub Draw(oDrawSpace As Object)
          End Sub
                            
  3. Type the following code into the ICircle Class Module:

          Option Explicit
          Implements IShape
    
          Dim X As Long, Y As Long, iRadius As Long
    
          Private Sub IShape_Draw(oDrawSpace As Object)
            oDrawSpace.Circle (X, Y), iRadius
          End Sub
    
          Private Sub IShape_SetXY(ByVal NewX As Long, ByVal NewY As Long)
            X = NewX
            Y = NewY
          End Sub
    
          Public Property Let Radius(ByVal NewVal As Long)
            iRadius = NewVal
          End Property
                            
  4. Type the following code in the ISquare Class Module:

          Option Explicit
          Implements IShape
    
          Dim X As Long, Y As Long, Side As Long
    
          Private Sub IShape_Draw(oDrawSpace As Object)
            oDrawSpace.Line (X, Y)-(X + Side, Y + Side), , B
          End Sub
    
          Private Sub IShape_SetXY(ByVal NewX As Long, ByVal NewY As Long)
            X = NewX
            Y = NewY
          End Sub
    
          Public Property Let SideLength(ByVal NewVal As Long)
            Side = NewVal
          End Property
                            
  5. Add a CommandButton to the lower edge of the form.
  6. Type the following code in the form module:

          Option Explicit
    
          Private Sub Command1_Click()
    
          Dim C As ICircle, S As ISquare
            Set C = New ICircle
            Set S = New ISquare
          ' Manipulate circle shape (using With)
            C.Radius = 250
            With IShape(C)
              .SetXY 400, 400
              .Draw Me
            End With
          ' Manipulate square shape (without using With)
            IShape(S).SetXY 700, 300
            S.SideLength = 300
            IShape(S).Draw Me
          End Sub
    
          Function IShape(oShape As IShape) As IShape
            Set IShape = oShape
          End Function
                            
  7. Run the project and click the CommandButton. You will see a circle and a square drawn on the form background.


REFERENCES

Microsoft Visual Basic Help topic "Implements Statement"


Additional query words: kbVBp500 kbVBp600 kbdse kbDSupport kbVBp

Keywords: kbhowto KB168830