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Microsoft KB Archive/106258

From BetaArchive Wiki

Contents of the Encarta 1994 README.WRI PSS ID Number: Q106258 Article last modified on 11-30-1993 PSS database name: MMTitles

1994

WINDOWS

The information in this article applies to:
- Microsoft Encarta, 1994 edition

SUMMARY

The following is the complete text of the README file that comes with Microsoft Encarta 1994 edition.

====================================================================== More Information About Microsoft Windows for Workgroups ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________

This document contains important information not available in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide or in online Help. For additional information about Windows for Workgroups, see “Other Online Documents” at the end of this document.

Note: If you plan on using a terminate-and-stay-resident (TSR) program with Windows for Workgroups, please read the SETUP.TXT online document first. It contains important information about running TSR programs with Windows for Workgroups and the Setup program.

Using Write to View This Document

If you enlarge the Write window to its maximum size, this document will be easier to read. To do so, click the Maximize button in the upper-right corner of the window. Or open the Control menu in the upper-left corner of the Write window (press ALT+SPACEBAR), and then choose the Maximize command.

To move through the document, press PAGE UP or PAGE DOWN. Or click the arrows at the top and bottom of the scroll bar along the right side of the Write window.

To print the document, choose Print from the File menu.

For Help on using Write, press F1.

To read other online documents, choose Open from the File menu.

Contents

This document contains information about the following topics:

1.0 Running Windows for Workgroups with an Operating System Other Than MS- DOS

2.0 Preventing Stack Overflow

3.0 Using 32-Bit Disk Access

4.0 Using Memory Managers and Vshare 4.1 Solving Memory Conflicts by Using MONOUMB.386 or MONOUMB2.386 4.2 Solving Memory Conflicts by Excluding an Address Range 4.3 Using 386MAX 4.4 Turning On Sharing Popup with Vshare

5.0 Using Advanced Power Management (APM)

6.0 Using SMARTDrive Version 4.0 6.1 Accessing Floppy Disk Drives on Older COMPAQ DESKPROS 6.2 Using SMARTDrive with Double Buffering 6.3 Using SMARTDrive with Norton Utilities Version 6.0 Disk Monitor 6.4 Using SMARTDrive with SuperStor Disk-Compression Utility 6.5 Using SMARTDrive with Copy-Protected Games and Applications

7.0 Using Multimedia Extensions with Windows for Workgroups 7.1 Upgrading to Windows for Workgroups 7.2 Configuring MIDI Setups 7.3 Configuring Your Display 7.4 Sample MIDI File 7.5 Using HyperGuide 7.6 Using Music Box 7.7 Using Alarm Clock

8.0 Running Specific MS-DOS-based Applications 8.1 Creative Labs JukeBox 8.2 Game or Timing-Sensitive Applications 8.3 Third-Party Expanded-Memory Emulators with MS-DOS Version 5.0 8.4 PC Tools Applications 8.5 WordPerfect Version 5.1 8.6 3270-Emulation Applications 8.7 C/C++ Version 7.0

9.0 Running Communications Applications

10.0 Using Specific Display Adapters with Windows for Workgroups

10.1 Installing Display Adapters by Following the Manufacturer’s Instructions 10.2 Upgrading Display Drivers When Using Soft-Font Packages 10.3 Using Self-Configuring Display Adapters 10.4 LCD 10.5 SuperVGA 10.6 Third-Party Display Drivers: Running MS-DOS-based Applications 10.7 VGA-Compatible 10.8 Video Seven: Using 256-Color Support 10.9 WinSpeed 10.10 IBM XGA: Configuring Color and Resolution 10.11 IBM XGA: Using EMM386

11.0 Using Specific Mice with Windows for Workgroups 11.1 Microsoft Mouse 11.2 Genius Mouse 11.3 Logitech Mouse 11.4 Logitech Cordless Mouse 11.5 Logitech or Microsoft Ballpoint Mouse on a Toshiba T2200SX 11.6 Mouse Systems Mouse on PS/2 Ports

12.0 Using Additional Hardware Configurations with Windows for Workgroups 12.1 CD-ROM Drives 12.2 EISA Systems with More Than 16 Megabytes of Extended Memory 12.3 Epson Screen Savers 12.4 NCR 925 with EMM386.EXE 12.5 Non-US Keyboard Layouts: Using Application Shortcut Keys 12.6 Plus Hardcard 12.7 SCSI Hard Disk Using DMA 12.8 Columbia Data Products SCSI Hard-Disk Controller 12.9 Serial Ports on 80286-Based Computers: Improving Performance 12.10 Sound Blaster Audio Card 12.11 Tandy 2500XL with MS-DOS in ROM 12.12 Wyse Computers

13.0 Using Mail 13.1 Running Mail with Windows for Workgroups in Standard Mode 13.2 Backing Up a Mail Message File 13.3 Creating and Accessing Other Message Files 13.4 Checking for New Mail 13.5 Sending a Bitmap as an Attachment 13.6 Compressing Shared Folders 13.7 Connecting to a Postoffice on a NetWare Server 13.8 Workgroup Postoffice Must Be at the Root of Share 13.9 Workgroup Postoffice Share Names 13.10 Multiple Mail users on One Computer 13.11 Creating Schedule+ Resources

14.0 Other Online Documents







1.0 Running Windows for Workgroups with an Operating System Other Than MS-DOS

Microsoft Windows for Workgroups and MS-DOS work together as an integrated system. They were designed together and extensively tested together on a wide variety of computers and hardware configurations. Running Windows for Workgroups on an operating system other than MS- DOS could cause unexpected results or poor performance.

2.0 Preventing Stack Overflow

Stacks are temporary data structures that MS-DOS and applications use for processing hardware events. If, while setting up Windows for Workgroups, the Setup program detects hardware or software that require a certain stack size, Setup places the following command line in your CONFIG.SYS file:

stacks=9,256

This should be sufficient most of the time. However, if you receive the “Internal Stack Overflow” message when Windows for Workgroups is running in 386 enhanced mode, or if your system fails for no apparent reason when Windows for Workgroups is running in standard mode (especially if you are setting up or moving the mouse), first try increasing the second number on the stacks= command line (for example, 256) If that doesn’t work, try increasing the first number (for example, 9). For more information about the stacks setting and modifying the CONFIG.SYS file, see your MS-DOS documentation.

3.0 Using 32-Bit Disk Access

By default, 32-bit disk access is turned off to prevent disk errors on some battery-powered portable computers. However, 32-bit disk access may run correctly with some battery-powered portable computers, such as the Zenith MasterSport SL. If you want to try using 32-bit disk access, select the Use 32 Bit Disk Access check box in the expanded Virtual Memory dialog box (choose the 386 Enhanced option in Control Panel). For more information, see Chapter 11, “Managing Memory and Performance,” in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide.

Caution: Before you use 32-bit disk access on a battery-powered portable computer, it is highly recommended that you back up your hard disk. Because 32-bit disk access has not been fully tested on all battery-powered systems, you may receive disk errors while using it.

4.0 Using Memory Managers and Vshare

This section describes problems you may encounter while using memory managers and the VSHARE.386 file-sharing/file-locking program with Windows for Workgroups.

4.1 Solving Memory Conflicts by Using MONOUMB.386 or MONOUMB2.386

If you encounter the following message when starting Windows for Workgroups in 386 enhanced mode, your display driver may be accessing the monochrome address range (B000-B7FF), which prevents the memory manager from using this range for upper memory blocks:

“Windows cannot set up an upper memory block at segment B000. Exclude this address space by using the syntax of your memory manager. For more information, see the README.WRI file. Type WIN /S to start Windows for Workgroups in standard mode and choose the Read Me icon.”

To solve this problem, try installing MONOUMB2.386 on your system. MONOUMB2.386 is a device driver provided with Windows for Workgroups that allows certain memory managers to use the monochrome address range for upper memory blocks even if your display driver is accessing this range.

To install MONOUMB2.386:

  1. Copy and expand the MONOUMB2.38_ file that is on your Windows for Workgroups disk to your Windows SYSTEM directory by typing the following at the MS-DOS prompt:

expand a:_ c:

  1. Add the following setting to the [386Enh] section in the SYSTEM.INI file:

device=monoumb2.386

  1. Start Windows for Workgroups.

Note: MONOUMB2.386 may not work with some memory managers, such as EMM386.EXE. In this case, you can try using MONOUMB.386, provided with the Windows Driver Library (WDL). To obtain a copy of the WDL, contact Microsoft.

You can also exclude the address region B000-B7FF. This specifies that the memory manager should not try to use this address range for upper memory blocks. For information about excluding specific address ranges, see the following topic.

4.2 Solving Memory Conflicts by Excluding an Address Range

If you encounter the following message when starting Windows for Workgroups in 386 enhanced mode, and the address specified is not B000, you must exclude the address range:

“Windows cannot set up an upper memory block at segment xxxx. Exclude this address space by using the syntax of your memory manager. For more information, see the README.WRI file. Type WIN /S to start Windows for Workgroups in standard mode and choose the Read Me icon.”

If the address specified is B000, you can try using MONOUMB2.386 or MONOUMB.386, as described in the preceding topic.

The method you use to exclude an address range depends on the memory manager you are using. For example, if you are using EMM386.EXE, you need to remove the I=xxxxx option from the device=emm386.exe command line in your CONFIG.SYS file, where xxxxx is the address range starting at the address specified in the error message.

If you are using QEMM, you need to include the X= option on the device=qemm386.sys command line in your CONFIG.SYS file. For example, to exclude the address range C000-C7FF, you would specify the following:

device=qemm386.sys X=C000-C7FF

For more information about modifying your CONFIG.SYS file, see your MS- DOS documentation. For more information about installing and configuring EMM386.EXE, see Chapter 11, “Managing Memory and Performance,” in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide. For information about installing and configuring other memory managers, see the documentation provided with your memory manager.

4.3 Using 386MAX

If you are running 386MAX with Windows for Workgroups, note the following:

Do not use options that limit the EMS swap region in the upper memory area. If you include exclude= options on the 386max or bluemax command line or in the .PRO file (usually called 386MAX.PRO), make sure that the address range specified does not extend beyond A000.

For example, exclude=1800-A000 is acceptable, but exclude=1800-B800 is not. If the address range specified by using the exclude= option extends beyond A000, Windows for Workgroups may not run properly in 386 enhanced mode. If you must exclude an address range above A000, use the RAM= option instead. For more information about this and other options, see your 386MAX documentation.

Do not use the 386MAX parameter EXT=0. This parameter may cause Windows to fail during Setup. After setting up, if Windows is running in standard mode, this parameter causes your system to lock up when you quit Windows.

Do not load SMARTDrive when QCache is running.

Note: The 386MAX setup program does not detect SMARTDrive version 4.0 and may recommend that you install QCache.

If you update an earlier version of 386MAX to version 6.0, the 386MAX version 6.0 setup program may not remove the LOAD=WINDOWS.LOD line from your .PRO file. You can remove this line manually. It is not needed and removing it will free up a small amount of memory.

If for some reason you remove the net start command line from your AUTOEXEC.BAT, Windows may lock up during startup.

4.4 Turning On Sharing Popup with Vshare

VSHARE.386 is a file-sharing and file-locking program that is used when running Windows for Workgroups in 386 enhanced mode. With VSHARE, when a file-sharing violation occurs, you see an “Access denied” message, instead of the “Sharing violation on drive…” message used in versions of Windows that do not include networking.

Some MS-DOS-based applications may need the sharing-violation message. If you need to turn on this message, add the following line to the [386Enh] section of your SYSTEM.INI file:

EnableSharingPopups=TRUE

For more information about modifying the SYSTEM.INI file, see the SYSINI.WRI online document.

5.0 Using Advanced Power Management (APM)

Windows for Workgroups includes support for Advanced Power Management (APM). This enables Windows to extend battery life, display power- status information, and work together with the suspend features of battery-powered personal computers. To find out if your computer supports APM, contact your computer manufacturer.

To install APM on your system:

  1. Quit Windows for Workgroups.

  2. Run Windows for Workgroups Setup and select one of the following system types:

    MS-DOS System with APM Intel 386SL Based System with APM

Select “Intel 386SL Based System with APM” if your computer has an Intel 386SL processor and supports the SL Enhanced Options for APM. Otherwise, select “MS-DOS System with APM.”

  1. Restart Windows for Workgroups.

A Power icon appears in the Control Panel window.

  1. Choose the Power icon to configure power-management settings.

For more information about the settings, choose the Help button or press F1 while using the Power Management dialog box.

6.0 Using SMARTDrive Version 4.0

This section describes some solutions to problems that you might encounter when using SMARTDrive version 4.0 (provided with Windows for Workgroups) together with specific applications or hardware.

6.1 Accessing Floppy Disk Drives on Older COMPAQ DESKPROS

On some COMPAQ DESKPRO 386/16 and 386/20 computers, you might experience problems accessing floppy disk drives when SMARTDrive version 4.0 is installed. To work around the problem, you can try one of the following solutions:

Place the SMARTDrive buffer into low memory by adding the following option to the smartdrv command line in the AUTOEXEC.BAT file:

smartdrv /L

Disable the caching on floppy disk drives by adding the following options to the smartdrv command line in the AUTOEXEC.BAT file:

smartdrv a- b-

For more information about these options, see Chapter 11, “Managing Memory and Performance,” in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide.

6.2 Using SMARTDrive with Double Buffering

Most expanded-memory emulators attempt to optimize SMARTDrive by configuring it to load into upper memory blocks (UMBs). This will cause problems if you are running Windows for Workgroups in 386 enhanced mode with double buffering. If you need to use double buffering with SMARTDrive, make sure that SMARTDrive is configured in the CONFIG.SYS file to load into low memory. The command line should look like this:

device=smartdrv.exe /double_buffer

This problem applies only to the smartdrv command line in the CONFIG.SYS file. It does not apply to the references to SMARTDrive in the AUTOEXEC.BAT file. For more information about using double buffering with SMARTDrive, see Chapter 11, “Managing Memory and Performance,” in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide.

6.3 Using SMARTDrive with Norton Utilities Version 6.0 Disk Monitor

Do not use the Disk Protect feature in Norton Utilities Version 6.0 Disk Monitor with SMARTDrive version 4.0. If you try to write to the protected drive, you will encounter an error and your system will fail. If you want to write to and cache a protected drive, add the drive letter to the smartdrv command line in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file. For example, if drive D is a protected drive, you would add the following:

smartdrv d

Or you can use the Norton cache program instead when using Disk Monitor.

6.4 Using SMARTDrive with SuperStor Disk-Compression Utility

Do not use the Create Mountable Drive, Mount, and Dismount features of SuperStor after SMARTDrive is loaded. You must configure your SuperStor partitions before loading SMARTDrive. Windows for Workgroups Setup places the smartdrv command line first in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file. If your AUTOEXEC.BAT file includes “mount” configuration commands, make sure that the smartdrv command line follows the SuperStor configuration command lines.

Also, you will receive read-write errors if you use SMARTDrive to cache a SuperStor compressed drive. To prevent SMARTDrive from caching the compressed drive, you must include the drive letter- option on the smartdrv command line.

For example, if drive C is the uncompressed drive, and drives E and F are the compressed SuperStor drives, you would include the following command line in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file:

smartdrv e- f-

6.5 Using SMARTDrive with Copy-Protected Games and Applications

When using SMARTDrive, you may encounter problems starting a copy- protected application that requires you to place the master disk in the floppy disk drive. To solve this problem, you need to disable caching on the floppy disk drive by using the drive letter- option when you load SMARTDrive. For example, if you load SMARTDrive from your AUTOEXEC.BAT file and are using drive A, you need to include the following command line in your AUTOEXEC.BAT file:

smartdrv a-

7.0 Using Multimedia Extensions Version 1.0 with Windows for Workgroups

This section covers information that is specific to using the Multimedia Extensions version 1.0 with Windows for Workgroups. It also covers additional tasks you need to perform to configure your system properly for use with the Multimedia Extensions.

7.1 Upgrading to Windows for Workgroups

To use the Multimedia Extensions with Windows for Workgroups, first set up Windows with Multimedia Extensions version 1.0. Then upgrade to Windows for Workgroups by installing it into the same directory. If you set up Windows for Workgroups before setting up Multimedia Extensions, not all the files will be properly installed.

7.2 Configuring MIDI Setups

When you set up Windows for Workgroups, Setup copies the Multimedia Extensions MIDI-setup file MIDIMAP.CFG to MIDIMAP.OLD, and then replaces it with an updated version. This version contains several new MIDI setups that support playing MIDI information authored according to General MIDI guidelines. If you want to use a setup in the new MIDIMAP.CFG file and are using sound drivers that are not provided by Windows for Workgroups, you need to change the port settings to match the ports used by your sound device. To do this, use the MIDI Mapper option in Control Panel.

You can also use the original MIDIMAP.CFG file (renamed by Setup to MIDIMAP.OLD). You might want to do this if the original file contains custom MIDI setups that you created yourself or that were provided by your sound-device manufacturer. To use the original file, rename MIDIMAP.CFG to MIDIMAP.WIN, and then rename MIDIMAP.OLD to MIDIMAP.CFG. If the port settings in your original setups refer to the Ad Lib or Sound Blaster ports and you are using different drivers, then you need to change the port settings to match the output ports used by your sound device.

For more information about using MIDI Mapper to modify MIDI setups, see Chapter 9, “Customizing Windows for Workgroups,” in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide.

7.3 Configuring Your Display

The Multimedia Extensions Display icon in Control Panel is not available when you upgrade from Windows with Multimedia version 1.0 to Windows for Workgroups. If you need to change options for your display, run Windows Setup from the Main group in Program Manager to make these changes.

7.4 Sample MIDI File

The sample MIDI file CANYON.MID included with Windows for Workgroups, which you can play with Windows Media Player, is provided by Passport Designs, Inc.

7.5 Using HyperGuide

The information in HyperGuide refers to Windows version 3.0, not Windows for Workgroups. If you need to use Windows documentation, see the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide that comes with Windows for Workgroups.

7.6 Using Music Box

Music Box is not fully compatible with Windows for Workgroups. Although your compact discs will play correctly, you will encounter problems when using the Save Info button in the Program dialog box to save disc-title and track-title information. If you want to modify this information, you must do so manually by editing the MUSICBOX.INI file. To add a new disc to the file, you can determine the disc ID number by viewing the information in the About dialog box.

7.7 Using Alarm Clock

The Alarm Clock in the Multimedia Extensions version 1.0 is not fully compatible with Windows for Workgroups. If you are using the digital display, the time may appear slanted or a system error may occur, depending on the size of the Alarm Clock window.

8.0 Running Specific MS-DOS-Based Applications

This section provides general information about running applications in Windows for Workgroups. It also describes problems you might encounter while running specific MS-DOS-based applications with Windows for Workgroups.

8.1 Creative Labs JukeBox

If you are using a Sound Blaster sound card, do not set up or use the JukeBox application included in your Sound Blaster package with Windows for Workgroups. JukeBox interferes with the Windows for Workgroups driver for the Ad Lib synthesizer and causes errors when you try to install the drivers for the Sound Blaster card.

8.2 Game or Timing-Sensitive Applications

Some game applications or applications that rely on the computer’s timer may perform poorly in Windows for Workgroups. You can try increasing the performance by turning off the TrapTimerPorts setting in the [386Enh] section of the SYSTEM.INI file, as follows:

TrapTimerPorts=OFF

Note: The TrapTimerPorts setting is on by default. Turning it off may cause errors or a loss of data when you transfer files by using a communications application. It is recommended that you leave this setting turned on when using a communications application.

8.3 Third-Party Expanded-Memory Emulators with MS-DOS Version 5.0

Many expanded-memory emulators will cause problems if you use them to provide upper memory blocks (UMBs) for the MS-DOS version 5.0 loadhigh and devicehigh commands. If you want to use these MS-DOS commands to load drivers or applications high, use the Windows EMM386.EXE expanded-memory emulator to provide UMBs instead. If you must use a third-party expanded-memory emulator, use the load high feature provided with the emulator instead of the MS-DOS commands.

8.4 PC Tools Applications

If you run a PC Tools MS-DOS-based application in a window, or if you switch to such an application while Windows is running in standard mode, the display might be garbled, because PC Tools applications use a graphics font that is not displayed correctly. (This problem does not occur if you run the application in a full screen when Windows is running in 386 enhanced mode.)

To correct the problem, start your PC Tools MS-DOS-based applications by using the /NF option. If these applications are included in a Program Manager group, use the Properties command to add the /NF option to the command line for each application. For more information about changing application properties, see Help for Program Manager.

You can also include the /NF option in the application’s program information file (PIF) by typing it in the Optional Parameters text box in PIF Editor, or you can use the PC Tools PC Config program to specify that PC Tools applications should use the Text Font to display information. For more information about changing an application’s PIF, see Chapter 8, “MS-DOS Applications,” in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide.

8.5 WordPerfect Version 5.1

When you run WordPerfect version 5.1 in a window, the Windows mouse pointer and the WordPerfect mouse pointer do not appear in the same place.

To fix this problem:

  1. In WordPerfect, press SHIFT+F1.
  2. Select M for Mouse and A for Acceleration Factor.
  3. Set the Acceleration Factor to 1.
  4. Press ENTER three times to return to your document.
  5. Enlarge the WordPerfect window to fill the entire screen.
  6. Move the Windows mouse pointer into the WordPerfect window, and then move it to the far-right edge of the window.
  7. Move the mouse pointer to the far-left edge of the window.
  8. Move the pointer back to the center of the window, and then move it down to the bottom edge.
  9. Finally, move the pointer up to the upper-left corner of the window.

The Windows mouse pointer and the WordPerfect mouse pointer should now be in the same location.

8.6 3270-Emulation Applications

You may encounter problems using certain 3270-emulation applications with Windows for Workgroups. If you are using one of these applications, it is recommended that you purchase the Windows for Workgroups Resource Kit for the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups Operating System Version 3.1. This kit provides troubleshooting information about using 3270-emulation applications, in addition to complete technical information about Windows for Workgroups for the support professional. It includes a technical reference manual and a disk containing helpful utilities, system-resource viewers, drivers, and accessories. To order the Resource Kit within the United States, dial:

1-800-642-7676

To order outside of the United States, dial the phone number for your area. You can find this number on the International Subsidiary card.

8.7 C/C++ Version 7.0

If you are running Microsoft C/C++ Version 7.0 with Windows for Workgroups and your system locks up when compiling a file, add the following line to the [386Enh] section of SYSTEM.INI:

MAXBPS=400

This increases the number of breakpoints the system uses.

For more information about this setting, see the Windows for Workgroups Resource Kit.

9.0 Running Communications Applications

This section describes some guidelines for using communications applications with Windows for Workgroups.

The maximum baud rate possible when running your communications program with Windows is determined by your CPU speed in addition to port and modem capabilities.To communicate at speeds of 9600 baud and faster, follow these guidelines:

Use Windows-based communications applications when possible.

Use 16550A-compatible serial ports and modems. To determine if your serial port is 16550A-compatible, you can run the Microsoft Diagnostics program (MSD.EXE) included with Windows for Workgroups. To run MSD, quit Windows, and then at the command prompt (not from MS-DOS Prompt within Windows), type msd and then press ENTER.

Avoid closing MS-DOS-based applications during a background download.

Use a PIF file to run MS-DOS-based communications applications. Use PIF Editor to select the “Background Execution” and “Lock Application Memory” check boxes.

When running an MS-DOS-based communications application in the background, reduce it to an icon rather than running it in a window.

SMARTDrive may cause download errors when it clears the write- behind cache. If this happens, disable the SMARTDrive write-behind cache during high-speed downloads. This can be done easily using the SmartMon utility included in the Windows for Workgroups Resource Kit.

10.0 Using Specific Display Adapters with Windows for Workgroups

This section describes some problems you might encounter when using specific display adapters or drivers with Windows for Workgroups.

10.1 Installing Display Adapters by Following the Manufacturer’s Instructions

The procedures that are provided by display-adapter manufacturers for installing display adapters may require you to replace or modify the SETUP.INF file in the Windows SYSTEM directory. This will cause problems in Windows for Workgroups.

If your third-party display-adapter installation replaces or modifies the SETUP.INF file, use the following procedure instead.

To install the display-adapter drivers:

  1. Rename the SETUP.INF file provided with your display-adapter package to OEMSETUP.INF, and place it on the disk and in the directory containing the third-party display-driver files.
  2. Run Windows Setup from the Main group and select Other Display (Requires disk from OEM) from the list of Display options.
  3. Insert the disk that contains the OEMSETUP.INF file and the driver files for your display adapter. Or, if these files are located on your hard disk, type the path to the directory that contains the files, and then choose the OK button.
  4. Select the type of display adapter you want to use, and then choose the OK button.

Setup copies all necessary files from the driver disk and may request files from the Windows for Workgroups disks.

  1. Insert any additional disks that are requested, and then choose the OK button.

If you accidentally overwrite the original SETUP.INF file, you can copy it from Windows for Workgroups Disk 1 back into your Windows SYSTEM directory.

10.2 Upgrading Display Drivers When Using Soft-Font Packages

If you are using certain soft-font packages, including Bitstream Facelift, Publisher PowerPak, and Hewlett-Packard Intellifont, Setup may not update your display driver when you upgrade to Windows for Workgroups. In thiscase, you need to update your display driver after you have set up Windows for Workgroups. To do this, run Windows Setup from the Main group, and then select the display driver you want to use from the list of Display options. For more information about using Setup after you have installed Windows, see Chapter 10, “Configuring Hardware,” in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide.

10.3 Using Self-Configuring Display Adapters

Some display adapters can change their configurations to match what an application tries to do. For example, if an application tries to use a video graphics adapter (VGA) configuration and your display adapter is currently configured as an enhanced graphics adapter (EGA), the adapter can switch from an EGA configuration to a VGA configuration. This type of display adapter makes use of nonmaskable interrupts (NMIs) to change its configuration while you work.

To use this type of display adapter with Windows running in 386 enhanced mode, you must disable the NMI (also called self-configuring, auto-switching, or auto-emulating) option. Configure the display adapter, and then disable the NMI option. For more information, see your display-adapter documentation.

10.4 LCD

If you use an LCD screen, set it for white text on a black background instead of black text on a white background. When Windows is running, black text on a white background wears out LCD screens. See the documentation for your screen for instructions on how to do this.

10.5 Super VGA

If you are using a video card and monitor (NEC MultiSync 3D/4D/5D or other multifrequency monitor) capable of 800x600, 16-color resolution with a third-party Super VGA driver, or one of the following drivers provided in the Windows 3.0 Supplemental Driver Library (SDL):

ATI Mode 54h (800x600 16 colors) v2.00

CHIPS Super VGA 82C451 (800x600 16 colors) CHIPS Super VGA 82C452 (800x600 16 colors) Paradise VGA (800x600 16 colors)

use the Super VGA (800x600, 16 colors) driver provided with Windows for Workgroups instead. If you do not update your driver, Windows may not work properly when running in 386 enhanced mode. In addition, the version 3.1 driver contains new features and performance enhancements.

To install the Windows for Workgroups Super VGA driver, run Windows Setup from the Main group, and then select “Super VGA 800x600, 16 colors” from the list of Display options. For more information about using Setup after you have installed Windows for Workgroups, see Chapter 10, “Configuring Hardware,” in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide.

Super VGA VESA Mode 6Ah

Some Super VGA adapters support higher monitor-refresh rates at 800x600 resolution with a special VESA mode. If both your video adapter and monitor support a higher refresh rate and if you are using the Super VGA driver, you may be able to get better video results by including the following setting in the [display] section of the SYSTEM.INI file:

svgamode=106

If you encounter problems using this mode, delete this setting from the SYSTEM.INI file, and then restart Windows for Workgroups.

10.6 Third-Party Display Drivers: Running MS-DOS-Based Applications

If you are using a display driver that is not provided with Windows for Workgroups and you receive one of the following messages while trying to run a MS-DOS-based application:

“Incorrect system version. Run the Windows Setup program again.” or “386 System display type mismatch.”

contact your display manufacturer for an updated driver. You can also solve this problem manually by installing version 3.0 driver files. These files are included on the Windows for Workgroups disks.

If your display driver works in Windows version 3.0 using the standard VGA virtual-display-device file (specified by the device=*vddvga setting in the [386Enh] section of the SYSTEM.INI file), use the following procedure.

To install the driver files:

  1. Copy and expand the VDDVGA30.386 file from the Windows for Workgroups disk to your Windows SYSTEM directory by typing the following at the MS-DOS prompt:

expand a:_ c:

  1. Change the display= setting in the [386Enh] section of the SYSTEM.INI file to:

display=vddvga30.386

  1. Restart Windows for Workgroups.

If your display driver works in Windows version 3.0 using the standard VGA grabber file (specified by the 386Grabber=VGA.GR3 setting in the [boot] section of the SYSTEM.INI file), use the following procedure.

To install the driver files:

  1. Copy and expand the VGA30.3GR file from the Windows for Workgroups disk to your Windows SYSTEM directory.
  2. Change the 386Grabber setting in the [386Enh] section of the SYSTEM.INI file to:

386Grabber=vga30.3gr

  1. Restart Windows for Workgroups.

For more information about modifying the SYSTEM.INI file, see the SYSINI.WRI online document.

10.7 VGA-Compatible

Most VGA-compatible display-adapter cards and main-adapter chips use additional memory to enhance their performance. When Windows is running in 386 enhanced mode and is configured for VGA, Windows detects most of these cards and automatically excludes the additional memory.

However, if you have an enhanced VGA that Windows does not recognize, you must exclude the additional memory yourself by adding the following line to the [386Enh] section of the SYSTEM.INI file:

emmexclude=C400-C7FF

For more information about modifying the SYSTEM.INI file, see the SYSINI.WRI online document.

10.8 Video Seven: Using 256-Color Support

Windows for Workgroups provides 256-color support at several resolutions for Video Seven display adapters that have at least 512K of video memory. The following table shows the Video Seven 256-color modes that are supported by the display drivers provided with Windows for Workgroups.

Model 640x480 720x512 800x600 1024x768 ______________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________

FastWrite 512K Yes 1024i 512K Yes VRAM 512K Yes Yes VRAM II 512K Yes Yes VRAM II 1MB Yes Yes Yes Yes

If you are using a Video Seven display adapter that has at least 512K of video memory, you should use one of these display drivers. These drivers take full advantage of the performance improvements and mouse support in MS-DOS-based applications. To install one of the drivers, run Windows Setup from the Main group, and then select the driver you want from the list of Display options. For more information about using Setup after you have installed Windows, see Chapter 10, “Configuring Hardware,” in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide.

Note: Windows for Workgroups does not include drivers for the new Video Seven display adapters that are based on Headland Technology/Video 7 HT216, HT216-32, or HT217. If you have one of these display adapters, Setup automatically installs a VGA driver. Your display-adapter package may include an updated driver, which you can install by using the instructions included in the package. If no updated driver is included, you can obtain one by contacting your display-adapter vendor.

10.9 WinSpeed

The WinSpeed version 1.0 installation program, INSTALL.EXE, does not work properly with Windows for Workgroups. It copies an incompatible version of the SETUP.INF file to your Windows directory. To install WinSpeed for use with Windows for Workgroups, you must get updated installation disks from Panacea.

If you have already used the INSTALL.EXE program to install the WinSpeed drivers on your system, the following message appears when you try to run Windows Setup from the Main group:

“The SETUP.INF file on your system is not valid for use with this version of Setup.”

To correct this problem:

  1. If there is a SETUP.INF file in your Windows directory, delete it. (The SETUP.INF file should never be in your Windows directory.)
  2. Copy the SETUP.INF file on Windows for Workgroups Disk 1 to your Windows SYSTEM directory.
  3. Contact Panacea, Inc. for updated WinSpeed installation disks that are compatible with Windows for Workgroups, and then use these to reinstall WinSpeed.

10.10 IBM XGA: Configuring Color and Resolution

Windows Setup automatically configures an IBM XGA for 16-color, 640x480 resolution. If your monitor can support 256 colors or higher resolutions, you can configure your XGA to use the color and resolution settings you want. To do this, run Windows Setup from the Main group, and then select one of the following drivers from the list of Display options:

XGA (640x480, 16 colors)

This is the default setting and should not be changed if you are using the plasma screen on the PS/2 model 75.

XGA (640x480, 256 colors) XGA (Small fonts) XGA (Large fonts)

Both the Small and Large fonts settings configure the XGA for 1024x786 resolution and 256 colors, if your monitor supports it. Otherwise, these settings configure your display for 640x480 resolution. Select Small Fonts if you have a large monitor (at least 16 inches) or want to fit more information on your screen. Select Large Fonts if you want to improve the readability of text.

Make sure that your monitor supports the XGA configuration you select. If it does not, you return to the MS-DOS prompt when you try to start Windows for Workgroups.

For more information about using Setup after you have installed Windows, see Chapter 10, “Configuring Hardware,” in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide.

10.11 IBM XGA: Using EMM386

To use the IBM XGA display adapter successfully with the EMM386 expanded-memory emulator, you need to manually prevent EMM386 from using the memory address range used by the XGA display. A common range is C600-C7FF. To prevent the memory manager from using this range, include the X= option on the device=EMM386.EXE line in your CONFIG.SYS file, as follows:

device=EMM386.EXE X=C600-C7FF

To identify the exact range that your XGA display adapter uses, run the System Configuration Program on the System Reference Disk for your Personal System/2 (PS/2), and select “Display Memory Map.”

With some PS/2 model 75 plasma screens, or with XGA configured for 640x480 resolution and 16 colors, you must also include the NOEMS or RAM option on the device=EMM386.EXE line in your CONFIG.SYS file. For example:

device=EMM386.EXE NOEMS X=C600-C7FF

Do not include the i=B000-BE00 option on the device=EMM386.EXE line in your CONFIG.SYS file. This address range is used by the XGA when running Windows in 386 enhanced mode. Therefore, it cannot be used as upper memory area. Windows will not recognize XGA configurations if EMM386 is using this address range.

For more information about modifying your CONFIG.SYS file, see your MS-DOS documentation. For more information about installing the EMM386 expanded-memory emulator and configuring the way it uses memory, see Chapter 11, “Managing Memory and Performance,” in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide.

11.0 Using Specific Mice with Windows for Workgroups

This section describes some problems you may encounter using specific types of mice with Windows for Workgroups.

11.1 Microsoft Mouse

Windows for Workgroups includes version 8.20 of the Microsoft mouse drivers. If you have a Microsoft mouse, Setup installs the Windows mouse driver (MOUSE.DRV) in your Windows SYSTEM directory and an MS- DOS mouse driver (MOUSE.COM or MOUSE.SYS) in your Windows directory. If you have additional versions of the Microsoft mouse drivers on your system, make sure that you are using the mouse drivers provided with Windows for Workgroups.

If you use the Microsoft Mouse Control Panel version 8.0 or later, you need to set your MS-DOS mouse variable to the directory on your hard disk that contains the control-panel program files POINT.EXE and PANEL.COM. You can do this by modifying your AUTOEXEC.BAT file. For example, if the control-panel program files are located in the directory, you would add the following line to your AUTOEXEC.BAT file:

set mouse=c:

This ensures that the mouse settings are stored in the MOUSE.INI file located in the specified directory. If the mouse variable is not set correctly, you may experience problems with mouse acceleration and other mouse settings.

It is recommended that you use the mouse driver MOUSE.COM instead of MOUSE.SYS, and that you load MOUSE.COM from your AUTOEXEC.BAT file. If you use MOUSE.SYS, you may encounter problems saving MS-DOS mouse control-panel settings. If you must use MOUSE.SYS and you encounter problems saving mouse settings, make sure you load the driver from your mouse directory instead of from your Windows directory.

For more information about installing the mouse drivers, see Chapter 6, “Troubleshooting,” in Getting Started.

11.2 Genius Mouse

If you are using a Genius mouse and are running MS-DOS-based applications in 386 enhanced mode, the mouse may not work properly, especially if you have several MS-DOS-based applications running at the same time.

To correct this problem, add the following line to the [386Enh] section of your SYSTEM.INI file:

local=PC$MOUSE

For more information about changing settings in the SYSTEM.INI file, see the SYSINI.WRI online document.

11.3 Logitech Mouse

Some Logitech mouse models are detected as “Microsoft or IBM PS/2” mouse models by the Setup program. In this case, Setup installs the mouse driver for the Microsoft or IBM PS/2 mouse. If you have a Logitech mouse, you should use the Logitech mouse driver instead.

To install the Logitech mouse driver, run Windows Setup from the Main group, and then select Logitech from the list of Mouse options. For more information about using Setup after you have installed Windows, see Chapter 10, “Configuring Hardware,” in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide.

When installing the Logitech mouse driver, Windows Setup copies the LMOUSE.COM file to your Windows directory. This is the mouse driver that is required in order to use the Logitech mouse with MS-DOS-based applications. To use your mouse with MS-DOS-based applications, you need to load LMOUSE.COM before you start Windows. You can do this by adding it to your AUTOEXEC.BAT file. You also need to add the following line to the [386Enh] section of your SYSTEM.INI file:

local=PC$MOUSE

11.4 Logitech Cordless Mouse

If you have a Logitech Cordless mouse and you run Windows in 386 enhanced mode, you may encounter problems, such as an unresponsive pointer, when running MS-DOS Prompt or MS-DOS-based applications in a window.

To correct this problem:

  1. Change the baud-rate setting for the mouse driver. To do this, add the following line to the [LogiMouse] section of the SYSTEM.INI file:

BaudRate=1200

  1. Include the 1200 option in the command line that loads the MS-DOS Logitech mouse driver (which is provided with Windows for Workgroups) as follows:

LMOUSE 1200

  1. Add the above line to your AUTOEXEC.BAT file to load the mouse driver each time you start your system. The next time you start Windows for Workgroups, your mouse should work correctly.

For more information about changing settings in the SYSTEM.INI file, see the SYSINI.WRI online document.

11.5 Logitech or Microsoft Ballpoint Mouse on a Toshiba T2200SX

If you are using a Toshiba T2200SX computer with a BIOS version earlier than 1.20 and you have a Logitech or Microsoft ballpoint mouse connected to the PS/2 mouse port, you may have problems moving the mouse pointer. If the mouse does not respond, try connecting your mouse to the serial port instead, or contact Toshiba for an upgraded version of the BIOS.

11.6 Mouse Systems Mouse on PS/2 Ports

The “Mouse Systems” serial and bus mouse drivers provided with Windows do not support a Mouse Systems mouse when it is connected to a PS/2 style mouse port. If you are using a Mouse Systems mouse connected to a PS/2 style mouse port, Setup installs the “Microsoft or IBM PS/2” mouse driver for you. This is the correct driver. Do not change it.

12.0 Using Additional Hardware Configurations with Windows for Workgroups

This section contains information about using Windows for Workgroups with different types of computers and hardware configurations.

12.1 CD-ROM Drives

If you are using a CD-ROM drive with Windows for Workgroups, you should use version 2.21 of Microsoft MS-DOS CD-ROM Extensions (MSCDEX) with all configurations of CD-ROM drives. If you use version 2.20 or later, you must also remove the following setting from the [386Enh] section of the SYSTEM.INI file:

device=LANMAN10.386

This setting can cause some CD-ROM drives to timeout and fail with versions later than 2.20 of MSCDEX. However, if you must use a version earlier than 2.20 of MSCDEX, the above setting is required in the [386Enh] section of your SYSTEM.INI file.

For more information about changing settings in the SYSTEM.INI file, see the SYSINI.WRI online document.

If a CD-ROM drive causes instability in your system or causes your system to fail, you may need to update the CD-ROM driver. Also, the MCI (Media Control Interface) driver MCICDA.DRV may not work properly with older CD-ROM drivers. Contact your CD-ROM-drive manufacturer about obtaining an updated driver.

12.2 EISA Systems with More Than 16 Megabytes of Extended Memory

On some EISA (Extended Industry Standard Architecture) computers, there may be more extended memory available than the system’s Int 15h/88h BIOS call can detect. On these computers, HIMEM.SYS uses only the amount of extended memory detected. This can result in a large amount of unused memory.

You can have HIMEM.SYS use all available extended memory by using the /EISA option in the CONFIG.SYS file. For example, if HIMEM.SYS is located in your WINDOWS directory, you would use the following command line in the CONFIG.SYS file to take advantage of all available extended memory:

device=c:.sys /EISA

If you use the /EISA option, do not load any device drivers that use the Int 15h/88h BIOS call to allocate extended memory before loading HIMEM.SYS. If you do, your system may not work properly. If you must reserve some extended memory for device drivers or applications that use the Int 15h/88h BIOS call, you can specify the amount of memory in kilobytes that you want reserve by using the /INT15= option. For example, if you want to reserve 128 kilobytes of extended memory, you would use the following command line in the CONFIG.SYS file:

device=c:.sys /EISA /INT15=128

HIMEM.SYS must still be loaded before other device drivers in the CONFIG.SYS file.

To determine if your device driver or application use the Int15h/88h BIOS call, see the documentation for your device or contact your device dealer. For more information about using HIMEM.SYS with the INT15 option, see Chapter 11, “Managing Memory and Performance,” in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide.

12.3 Epson Screen Savers

Some Epson computers have screen-saver utilities that clear the screen after a specified period of inactivity. With Windows for Workgroups, the screen saver might detect that the system is idle when it is not. Windows will function properly even though the screen is blank, but nothing will be displayed until you quit Windows and then restart it.

See the documentation that you received with your Epson computer for instructions on how to turn off the screen saver.

12.4 NCR 925 with EMM386.EXE

If you are using an NCR 925 with EMM386.EXE, include the following option on the device=EMM386.EXE command line in your CONFIG.SYS file:

device=EMM386.EXE X=E000-EFFF

12.5 Non-US Keyboard Layouts: Using Application Shortcut Keys

Some non-US keyboards show two characters per alphabet key and three characters per alphanumeric key. To type the second or third character, you must press and hold down CTRL+ALT or ALTGR before pressing the key. If you are using such a keyboard layout, do not use keys that show two or three characters as application shortcut keys.

12.6 Plus Hardcard

To run Windows for Workgroups with a Hardcard, you must include the following line in the [386Enh] section in the SYSTEM.INI file:

VirtualHDIRQ=OFF

For information on how to modify the SYSTEM.INI file, see the SYSINI.WRI online document.

Note: This procedure is not necessary if you are using a Hardcard II or a Hardcard II XL.

It is also recommended that you use SMARTDrive with a Hardcard. For more information about using SMARTDrive, see Chapter 11, “Managing Memory and Performance,” in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide.

12.7 SCSI Hard Disk Using DMA

If your computer has a SCSI hard disk that uses Direct Memory Access (DMA), you must include the following entry in the [386Enh] section of the SYSTEM.INI file:

VirtualHDIRQ=OFF

In addition, you must have SMARTDrive installed and you must NOT disable double-buffering by removing or remarking out the option in the CONFIG.SYS file.

For information on how to modify the SYSTEM.INI file, see the SYSINI.WRI online document.

12.8 Columbia Data Products SCSI Hard-Disk Controller

To use the Columbia Data Products SCSI hard-disk controller with Windows for Workgroups in 386 enhanced mode, you must update the Columbia Data Products SCSI driver to version 3.35 or higher.

12.9 Serial Ports on 80286-Based Computers: Improving Performance

If the baud rate-setting for your COM ports is 9600 or higher and you are experiencing slow COM performance or are losing characters when sending or receiving information using a communications application in standard mode, try the following solutions to correct the problem. Try solution one first. If that doesn’t work, then try solution two, and so on:

  1. Reduce the number of MS-DOS drivers and terminate-and-stay- resident programs (TSRs) loaded from your CONFIG.SYS file.
  2. Add the following line to the [standard] section of the SYSTEM.INI file:

FasterModeSwitch=1

Note: The FasterModeSwitch setting may not work on older systems or systems that are incompatible with Windows for Workgroups. In this case, Windows may fail when you start it.

  1. Do not load MS-DOS 5.0 into upper memory (do not include the command line dos=high in your CONFIG.SYS file).

For information on how to modify the SYSTEM.INI file, see the SYSINI.WRI online document.

12.10 Sound Blaster Audio Card

If you are using a Sound Blaster audio card that includes a Digital Signal Processor (DSP) chip earlier than version 2.0, you may want to upgrade to version 2.0 to improve audio performance. To find out which version of the DSP chip you currently have, run the TEST-SBC.EXE utility included in your Sound Blaster package. To receive version 2.0 of the DSP chip, contact Creative Labs, Inc.

12.11 Tandy 2500 XL with MS-DOS in ROM

The Tandy 2500 XL can be configured to use MS-DOS in read-only memory (ROM). If you want to use this feature, after you run Windows Setup you must run the Tandy setup program (SETUPXL). Modify your configuration so that your AUTOEXEC.BAT and CONFIG.SYS files are read from drive C.

12.12 Wyse Computers

If you are using a Wyse computer to run Windows, you might need to modify the device=HIMEM.SYS line in your CONFIG.SYS file to read:

device=[path]HIMEM.SYS /M:WYSE

13.0 Using Mail

This section gives some additional information about using Mail with Windows for Workgoups.

13.1 Running Mail with Windows for Workgroups in Standard Mode

If you plan to run Mail with Windows for Workgroups running in standard mode, you must run SHARE.EXE before starting Windows for Workgroups. SHARE controls file-sharing and file-locking in standard- mode. Each application that accesses your Mail message file must be able to lock portions of the file to prevent other applications from overwriting information in the file. Mail will not start if you have not run SHARE.EXE.

When you are running Mail with Windows for Workgroups in 386 enhanced mode, VSHARE.386 is loaded automatically, so SHARE.EXE is not needed.

13.2 Backing Up the Mail Message File

In some circumstances, Mail may encounter problems in the mail message file (.MMF) and you will be asked if you want Mail to repair the file. If you choose Yes, Mail makes a backup copy of the message file in the Windows directory or in the directory specified by the MailTmp parameter in the MSMAIL.INI file. Each time the file is repaired, a new backup file is created. The first such backup file will be named MSMAIL.BAK, and subsequent backup files will be named MSMAIL.001, MSMAIL.002, etc. You can delete these backup files.

13.3 Creating and Accessing Other Message Files

You can create message files in addition to your primary message file by using the Backup command or the Export Folders command.

To access these files, use the /f option to include the name of the file in the Mail command line, as follows:

msmail.exe /f filename

Mail starts offline, and then opens the specified message file instead of your primary message file. To revert to your primary message file, start Mail without using the /f option.

13.4 Checking for New Mail

The setting in the Options dialog box that determines how often Mail checks for new messages also determines how often Mail checks the Outbox for messages to submit to the postoffice. A message first waits in the Outbox for the amount of time specified, and then waits again for the same amount of time until Mail checks for new messages. For example, if you specified that Mail should check for new messages every three minutes, it can take up to six minutes before you receive new mail.

If it takes longer than you expect to receive your messages, try specifying a lower value.

13.5 Sending a Bitmap as an Attachment

In a mail message, if you include a bitmap that was created by using Paintbrush or another graphics application, the recipient may not be able to view the bitmap if using a display adapter that has a different resolution from yours.

13.6 Compressing Shared Folders

When compressing shared folders in the Postoffice Manager, the administrator should ensure that the shared folders are not being used by Mail users.

13.7 Connecting to a Postoffice on a NetWare Server

When you connect to an existing postoffice by using Mail, Mail displays a network-share browser which enables the user to select the network server and share on which the postoffice resides. For NetWare servers, the user must have previously attached to the server. Then, in the Network Path box, the user can specify the path to the postoffice directory.

13.8 Workgroup Postoffice Must Be at the Root of Share

If you create a Workgroup Postoffice on a LAN Manager or similar network server, you must define a share on that server that has the WGPO directory as its root. When users run Mail to connect to a postoffice on the network, they can select only a postoffice that resides in the root of the share, not one in a subdirectory of the share.

13.9 Workgroup Postoffice Share Name

The share name defined for a Workgroup Postoffice should not be longer than eight characters. Mail has difficulty connecting to the postoffice if the share name is longer than eight characters.

13.10 Multiple Mail Users on One Computer

Mail creates two files the first time a user signs in to Mail. These files, named MSMAIL.INI and MSMAIL.MMF, are created in the user’s Windows directory. MSMAIL.INI contains the postoffice location and user-preference information. MSMAIL.MMF contains the user’s messages. Access is controlled by the user’s Mail password.

When a user runs Mail for the first time on a computer, Mail creates these two files for this user. If a second user wants to use Mail on the same computer, that user needs to rename the two existing files, to enable Mail to create new files for the second user. When the first user wants to use Mail again, he or she can rename the files.

For example, Joe signs in to Mail on his computer and Mail creates the MSMAIL.INI and MSMAIL.MMF files for Joe. After Joe quits and signs out of Mail, if Sue wants to run Mail she needs to rename these two files- -for example, to JOE.INI and JOE.MMF. When Sue signs in to Mail, new MSMAIL.INI and MSMAIL.MMF files are created for Sue. When Joe wants to sign in to Mail again, he needs to rename Sue’s files to, for example, SUE.INI and SUE.MMF, and then rename JOE.INI and JOE.MMF to MSMAIL.INI and MSMAIL.MMF respectively. Joe and Sue can continue alternating the use of Mail by using this renaming process. Any number of users can use Mail on the computer at different times by using this renaming technique.

Caution: The MSMAIL.MMF file contains all the messages and folders for a user. Care must be taken to not delete or overwrite this file, or all the mail for that user will be lost.

13.11 Creating Schedule+ Resources

To create a Schedule+ resource (for a conference room, overhead projector, or other shared equipment), the Mail Manager must do the following:

  1. Create a Mail account for that resource by using the Postoffice Manager command on the Mail menu.
  2. Quit and sign out of Mail.
  3. Sign in to Mail and Schedule+ by using the mailbox name and password that correspond to the resource.
  4. From the Schedule+ Options menu, choose the General Options command.
  5. Select “This account is for a resource,” and then choose the OK button.
  6. Quit Mail and Schedule+ by choosing Exit & Sign Out from the Schedule+ File menu.

If you will be setting up resources from a computer that is used by another Mail account, this process will require you to sign in as multiple Mail users on the same computer. As noted in the preceding section, you must take special steps to maintain separate message files (*.MMF files) on the same computer. If you do not need to maintain separate message files, you can use multiple accounts on the same computer by setting the account passwords to be the same. Resources do not receive mail, so in most cases there is no need to maintain separate message files for them. Therefore, if you are setting up resources on a computer that is used by only one other mail user (or no other mail users), set the passwords for all the accounts on that computer to be the same. You will be able to sign in as any of the accounts without following the extra steps described in the “Multiple Mail users on one computer” section.

14.0 Other Online Documents

The following table describes other online documents that contain important information about Windows for Workgroups that is not included in the Microsoft Windows for Workgroups User’s Guide or in Help:

Document Contains ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________

SETUP.TXT Information about problems that may occur when you set up Windows for Workgroups.

PRINTERS.WRI Information about specific printers and fonts.

NETWORKS.WRI Information about running Windows for Workgroups with specific network configurations.

SYSINI.WRI Information about the settings in the SYSTEM.INI file.

WININI.WRI Information about the settings in the WIN.INI file.

Additional reference words: 1994multi media multimedia multi-media

Copyright Microsoft Corporation 1993.