Everex Cloudbook

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intellivision
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Everex Cloudbook

Post by intellivision »

The main compeditor to ASUS's eee pc, Everex's Cloudbook, will be officially released on the 21st of February .
This $US399 laptop sports a 30gb HD with 512MB of ram, a 1.2 ghz processor, wifi, webcam and a whole bunch of other features that were left out of the eee pc. It runs gOS, a version of linux based of Ubuntu.
The exact specs are listed on Everex's home page:
http://www.everex.com/

It was supposed to be released yesterday but the date was pushed back until the 21st.
Rumor has it that the release was delayed because of a flaw in the setup which placed the buttons outside the screen area.

I think it would do much better than the eee pc, because as far as I can see 8GB of solid state isn't enough for most users.
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someone153
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Post by someone153 »

I would actually rather have and EEE PC. I just personally think the Cloudbook looks strange. The EEE PC also has a better GPU in it, but then again the Cloudbook has a slightly faster processor. I guess it just comes down to personally preference.

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Post by Frozenport »

I am a little confused as to why people buy the EEPC or even the Cloudbook (even more confused about the later)...

Go to eBay.com and spend 400 USD on a three year laptop which is better then these jokes. The screen size on the Asus makes it impossible to use for productivity applications such as making PowerPoints...
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Post by Jeff »

Frozenport wrote:I am a little confused as to why people buy the EEPC or even the Cloudbook (even more confused about the later)...

Go to eBay.com and spend 400 USD on a three year laptop which is better then these jokes. The screen size on the Asus makes it impossible to use for productivity applications such as making PowerPoints...
Agreed. I would much rather spend my money on This than on a EEE or Cloud.
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Post by Vista Ultimate R2 »

Or you can get a brand new Dell Vostro with a proper-sized screen and Windows Vista for under £300 all-in, I agree that these laptops aren't really worth it, especially not the "Cloudbook", which looks like a toy.
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Post by moonlit »

Vista Ultimate R2 wrote:Or you can get a brand new Dell Vostro with a proper-sized screen and Windows Vista for under £300 all-in, I agree that these laptops aren't really worth it, especially not the "Cloudbook", which looks like a toy.
...and now I officially hate you for making me question my decision to buy an eeepc.

I really want the eee for portability which the Vostros really can't match and I was going to order one in the next week or so, though I'm not liking the complete lack of stock anywhere and the potential for new model announcements soon after I order.

I also wasn't aware that a decent spec'd brand name laptop was available for prices that low in the UK, though without buying one worth £300 within the next 2 days shipping will cost me something like £60 which would push the cost up to that of most low end laptops from most big names.

The Cloudbook doesn't much interest me though as it's more expensive than the eee, doesn't have a solid state drive and is powered by a VIA CPU which I'm not keen on.

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Post by empireum »

moonlit wrote:I really want the eee for portability which the Vostros really can't match
Exactly. There are people (including me) who value portability and low weight over pretty much anything else and for those, the EeePC, Cloudbook et al are the cheapest options to get a subnotebook.
Vista Ultimate R2 wrote:Or you can get a brand new Dell Vostro with a proper-sized screen and Windows Vista for under £300 all-in, I agree that these laptops aren't really worth it, especially not the "Cloudbook", which looks like a toy.
Agreed, but then the Vostro is not a subnotebook. People wanting one will not buy a Vostro or anything along these lines. And proper subnotebooks still cost a lot more than "normal" notebooks, as I've had to painfully experience.
Frozenport wrote:Go to eBay.com and spend 400 USD on a three year laptop which is better then these jokes. The screen size on the Asus makes it impossible to use for productivity applications such as making PowerPoints...
I agree about the screen (480 pixels vertical resolution is just not enough), but again, see those as what they are, small and light subnotebooks. Set yourself a limit of US$400 and try to find a three-year-old subnotebook. I bet this'll get slightly harder.
someone153 wrote:but then again the Cloudbook has a slightly faster processor.
I beg to differ. I bet the EeePC's 900MHz Celeron (if it's actually running at that speed and not being downclocked to 600-ish MHz due to some issues) is faster than the CloudBook's 1.2GHz VIA C7. The clock speed is not everything that matters. I once had an 800MHz VIA C3 system, and a 450MHz Pentium III was faster.

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Post by Rixel »

Jeff wrote:
Frozenport wrote:I am a little confused as to why people buy the EEPC or even the Cloudbook (even more confused about the later)...

Go to eBay.com and spend 400 USD on a three year laptop which is better then these jokes. The screen size on the Asus makes it impossible to use for productivity applications such as making PowerPoints...
Agreed. I would much rather spend my money on This than on a EEE or Cloud.
Titaniums are nice and all except the screen has an odd tendency to break as do the hinges. As for the cloudbook it does kind of look odd not really liking the way it was setup too small a screen to do much.

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Post by Vista Ultimate R2 »

empireum wrote:Agreed, but then the Vostro is not a subnotebook. People wanting one will not buy a Vostro or anything along these lines. And proper subnotebooks still cost a lot more than "normal" notebooks, as I've had to painfully experience.
I wouldn't really say the Eee is a "sub-notebook" though, I'm afraid it looks (to me at least) more like one of those toy laptops rather than a proper sub-notebook... A proper sub-notebook should have a reasonable-size screen that is the same size as the casing, and it should also be able to run the latest version of Windows, which the Eee cannot either.

moonlit wrote:I also wasn't aware that a decent spec'd brand name laptop was available for prices that low in the UK, though without buying one worth £300 within the next 2 days shipping will cost me something like £60 which would push the cost up to that of most low end laptops from most big names.
The basic Vostro is only £280 including VAT and shipping (£179 without) - it's in the Small Business section of the website but there's apparently nothing to stop anyone from ordering one from there. I don't know if I'd trust that AMD processor to be much good though, I'd probably pay the extra £20 (ex. VAT) and get an Intel-powered one. I was actually half-tempted by one of these or something similar, I wouldn't mind having a laptop and they are unbelievably cheap. Ebuyer.com also have some HPs and Toshibas for around £300, albeit mostly with too little Ram (the Dell has 1 GB whereas the others often only have 512 MB, not really enough for Vista).
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Post by empireum »

Vista Ultimate R2 wrote:I wouldn't really say the Eee is a "sub-notebook" though, I'm afraid it looks (to me at least) more like one of those toy laptops rather than a proper sub-notebook...
Because it's too small or because of its appearance? I think they look rather sleek, both in white and black (I don't like the other colored versions though as these make it look like a toy).
Vista Ultimate R2 wrote:A proper sub-notebook should have a reasonable-size screen that is the same size as the casing, and it should also be able to run the latest version of Windows, which the Eee cannot either.
Yes, I agree completely. Depending on how you put it, the screen is either too small for the case (and looks lost in there) or the case is too big for the screen and looks huge. They should, IMHO, at least have put in a 1024-by-600 screen though (no matter how physically big it is) as the 800-by-480 resolution is too small for today. As for the latest version of Windows, you have a point, the Eee would probably be too slow for Vista, not mentioning it doesn't even have enough HD space. XP works fine on there though. But then you also have to consider the potential buyer for the EeePC. IMHO, these are students (both school & university), children ("My first PC") and people whose requirements are not that high. Id est, for someone mostly doing text-work and internet surfing and simultaneously wanting a small and light machine, the EeePC might just fit the gap perfectly. Someone wanting to buy a "proper subnotebook" who might even belong to the "typical subnotebook buyer class" (i.e. businessmen, travellers, etc.) will not look at the Eee apparently and buy a proper machine.

Generally speaking, I still would say the EeePC isn't that much of a bad deal, and TBH when finding out my MacBook was too big and heavy for me to frequently transport it, I shortly thought about keeping the MacBook as the full-blown machine to use at home or carry when I needed something more powerful and could afford transporting it, and buying an EeePC to use on the road, at university, wherever as it is light and small. I discarded the idea quickly though as I knew I'd want to do "heavy" stuff (image processing, audio editing, developing, virtualization) on the go very often which the Eee wouldn't be able to handle, thus forcing me to use the MacBook frequently and thus killing the point of me having an EeePC. Eventually, I sold the MacBook and got a real subnotebook instead. Still, the "amount" of hardware you get for the Eee's US$400 (€400 in Germany/Europe, which is much considering the current dollar course) price tag is not that bad. Of course, the Celeron is slow and the screen is not the best, but: The keyboard is usable, you get a nice set of expansion ports, the battery life is acceptable, you can upgrade the RAM to at least 2GB, there's a proper SSD (although a small one) in there, it has WiFi and you can run all sorts of apps on it, because it runs either a standard Linux distro (or you can install another one) or Windows XP.

Additionally, I think all these cheap machines do have a point. (1) They demonstrate that it is possible to build a small and light Linux-based machine for such a low price and the incredible demand for those (the EeePC has been out of stock for weeks here in Germany, at least last time I checked) shows people like them to some extent. Also, the fact they can't/don't run Vista (or Windows in general) gets less important when you reduce the OS to what it's meant to be, a means to an end. (2) Although I'm not really sure if that will happen or is already happening, I get the feeling these machines will help decrease the price for existing, "proper" machines even more. I mean, proper 12" subnotebooks are already nearing (or hitting) the US$1000 mark while they used to cost much more some years ago. Of course they'll have some negative sides or limitations, but still they've become significantly cheaper.

After all, I can't help thinking the EeePC looks sort of cute, though... Maybe someday in the future I can justify getting one to play around with.

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Post by Vista Ultimate R2 »

empireum wrote:Because it's too small or because of its appearance? I think they look rather sleek, both in white and black (I don't like the other colored versions though as these make it look like a toy).
I think it's mainly the way that the screen is so much smaller than the case - toy laptops often look like the real thing from the outside but when you open them up the screen is a tiny little thing in the middle of the inside of the lid. 800x600?! Wow, can you imagine Vista and Office 2007 squeezing into that?
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Post by empireum »

Vista Ultimate R2 wrote:I think it's mainly the way that the screen is so much smaller than the case - toy laptops often look like the real thing from the outside but when you open them up the screen is a tiny little thing in the middle of the inside of the lid.
Yes, agreed. Also one of my main concerns with the Eee.
Vista Ultimate R2 wrote:800x600?! Wow, can you imagine Vista and Office 2007 squeezing into that?
It's even less, it's 800x480. XP and Vista even complain about that every time you boot saying the resolution is too low

destiny

Post by destiny »

The Cloudbook just looks strange, so i'm getting a black Eee 4g 701. Its a good Computer for WLAN-DSLR-Photography, because it is small, the battery lasts for 3 and a half hours and it has an SSD so it can also fall on the floor with nothing happening.

greetz,

destiny

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