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 PostPost subject: Windows for Pen Computing        Posted: Sun Sep 02, 2007 9:52 pm 
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HI!
I've found a really interesting copy of Windows for Pen Computing, but right now I've got no way to test it. I would like to know what it is, since Wikipedia has a very very short article. Thanks a lot.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Sun Sep 02, 2007 10:06 pm 
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It was an early tablet pc operating system.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Sun Sep 02, 2007 10:09 pm 
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Well...
I could figure that out!! :D
I would like to know some of the main features. Did it had any text recognition? Something else than that article on Wikipedia.
Tanks a lot, thought!


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 12:31 am 
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Actually, Windows for Pen Computing had NOTHING to do with a tablet pc of any kind. Back in the days of DOS, there were a lot of industries that used a special light pen which you touched to a monitor, to get input. There are functions to use these light pens even in Qbasic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_pen


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 PostPost subject: Wow        Posted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 12:41 am 
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Well, I must test it. It must be pretty interesting.
Probably I'll soon buy a WinCE device, and I'll install it over PocketDOS!
Let's see!
By now I'm charmed with Windows Chicago Build 73 as my secondary os!
Charmed!


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 7:45 am 
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RentedMule wrote:
Actually, Windows for Pen Computing had NOTHING to do with a tablet pc of any kind. Back in the days of DOS, there were a lot of industries that used a special light pen which you touched to a monitor, to get input. There are functions to use these light pens even in Qbasic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Light_pen


Actually this is not true. There were the Dauphin DTR-1, DTR-2, the Thinkpad 360P, Thinkpad 710T, and so on (Even NEC made a PC-98 system tablet pc). These were early Tablet PC-s, and Windows for Pen Computing extension actually made for these machines.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Mon Sep 03, 2007 1:25 pm 
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Grisa wrote:
Actually this is not true. There were the Dauphin DTR-1, DTR-2, the Thinkpad 360P, Thinkpad 710T, and so on (Even NEC made a PC-98 system tablet pc). These were early Tablet PC-s, and Windows for Pen Computing extension actually made for these machines.


Wrong. First lets take a snippet from the wikipedia article I linked to:

"A light pen is a computer input device in the form of a light-sensitive wand used in conjunction with the computer's CRT monitor. It allows the user to point to displayed objects, or draw on the screen, in a similar way to a touch screen but with greater positional accuracy. A light pen can work with any CRT-based monitor, but not with LCD screens, projectors or other display devices."

Now take a look at these link:

http://www.computercloset.org/DauphinDTR1.htm
http://www.compuseum.de/dtr2.html
http://www.thinkwiki.org/wiki/Category:360P
http://www.thinkwiki.org/wiki/Category:710T
http://ployer.com/archives/2004/08/necs_versapro_p.php

ALL of them use LCD screen. None of them use a light pen. Instead, the Thinkpads used an electromagnetic pen, while the Dauphins and PC98, used a touchscreen and stylus. This doesn't even explore the fact that these devices are well outside of the timeline for Windows for Pen Computing.

I did notice, however, that some of the sites explaining Windows for Pen computing confuse the facts just as you did. But I know all of this from working experience.

Windows for Pen computing is designed for a Light Pen. Both the electromagnetic pen and the touchscreen/stylus can work with a simple mouse driver.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Tue Sep 04, 2007 8:27 am 
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RentedMule wrote:
Grisa wrote:
Actually this is not true. There were the Dauphin DTR-1, DTR-2, the Thinkpad 360P, Thinkpad 710T, and so on (Even NEC made a PC-98 system tablet pc). These were early Tablet PC-s, and Windows for Pen Computing extension actually made for these machines.


Wrong. First lets take a snippet from the wikipedia article I linked to:

"A light pen is a computer input device in the form of a light-sensitive wand used in conjunction with the computer's CRT monitor. It allows the user to point to displayed objects, or draw on the screen, in a similar way to a touch screen but with greater positional accuracy. A light pen can work with any CRT-based monitor, but not with LCD screens, projectors or other display devices."

Now take a look at these link:

http://www.computercloset.org/DauphinDTR1.htm
http://www.compuseum.de/dtr2.html
http://www.thinkwiki.org/wiki/Category:360P
http://www.thinkwiki.org/wiki/Category:710T
http://ployer.com/archives/2004/08/necs_versapro_p.php

ALL of them use LCD screen. None of them use a light pen. Instead, the Thinkpads used an electromagnetic pen, while the Dauphins and PC98, used a touchscreen and stylus. This doesn't even explore the fact that these devices are well outside of the timeline for Windows for Pen Computing.

I did notice, however, that some of the sites explaining Windows for Pen computing confuse the facts just as you did. But I know all of this from working experience.

Windows for Pen computing is designed for a Light Pen. Both the electromagnetic pen and the touchscreen/stylus can work with a simple mouse driver.
I am sure there is merit to what you know, & i'm sure
you have 1st hand experience from what you have personally dealt with,
however there is merit to what Grisa has added to the post had
you taken the time to perhaps do a little googling yourself as have I.
Nobody was here debating on how it works or what it was specifically built
for, but rather what it's features were & what it could do.

Quote:
In the late 1980s, early pen computer systems generated a lot of excitement and there was a time when it was thought they might eventually replace conventional computers with keyboards.

After all, everyone knows how to use a pen and pens are certainly less intimidating than keyboards.
Pen computers, as envisioned in the 1980s, were built around handwriting recognition. In the early 1980s, handwriting recognition was seen as an important future technology. Nobel prize winner Dr. Charles Elbaum started Nestor and developed the NestorWriter handwriting recognizer. Communication Intelligence Corporation created the Handwriter recognition system, and there were many others.
In 1991, the pen computing hype was at a peak. The pen was seen as a challenge to the mouse, and pen computers as a replacement for desktops. Microsoft, seeing slates as a potentially serious competition to Windows computers, announced Pen Extensions for Windows 3.1 and called them Windows for Pen Computing. Microsoft made some bold predictions about the advantages and success of pen systems that would take another ten years to even begin to materialize. In 1992, products arrived. GO Corporation released PenPoint. Lexicus released the Longhand handwriting recognition system. Microsoft released Windows for Pen Computing. Between 1992 and 1994, a number of companies introduced hardware to run Windows for Pen Computing or PenPoint. Among them were EO, NCR, Samsung, Dauphin, Fujitsu, TelePad, Compaq, Toshiba, and IBM. Few people remember that the original IBM ThinkPad was, as the name implies, slate computers.
The computer press was first enthusiastic, then very critical when pen computers did not sell. They measured pen computers against desktop PCs with Windows software and most of them found pen tablets difficult to use. They also criticized handwriting recognition and said it did not work. After that, pen computer companies failed. Momenta closed in 1992. They had used up US$40 million in venture capital. Samsung and NCR did not introduce new products. Pen pioneer GRiD was bought by AST for its manufacturing capacity. AST stopped all pen projects. Dauphin, which was started by a Korean businessman named Alan Yong, went bankrupt, owing IBM over $40 million. GO was taken over by AT&T, and AT&T closed the company in August 1994 (after the memorable "fax on the beach" TV commercials). GO had lost almost US$70 million in venture capital. Compaq, IBM, NEC, and Toshiba all stopped making consumer market pen products in 1994 and 1995.
By 1995, pen computing was dead in the consumer market. Microsoft made a half-hearted attempt at including "Pen Services" in Windows 95, but slate computers had gone away, at least in consumer markets. It lived on in vertical and industrial markets. Companies such as Fujitsu Personal Systems, Husky, Telxon, Microslate, Intermec, Symbol Technologies, Xplore, and WalkAbout made and sold many pen tablets and pen slates.
That was, however, not the end of pen computing. Bill Gates had always been a believer in the technology, and you can see slate computers in many of Microsoft's various "computing in the future" presentations over the years. Once Microsoft reintroduced pen computers as the "Tablet PC" in 2002, slates and notebook convertibles made a comeback, and new companies such as Motion Computing joined the core of vertical and industrial market slate computers specialists.
The primary reason why the Microsoft-specification Tablet PC is reasonably successful whereas earlier attempts were not has two reasons. First, the technology required for a pen slate simply wasn't there in the early 1990s. And second, the pen visionaries' idea of replacing keyboard input with handwriting (and voice) recognition turned out to be far more difficult than anticipated. There were actually some very good recognizers that are still being used today, but they all require training and a good degree of adaptation by the user. You can't just scribble on the screen and the computer magically understands everything. With the Tablet PC, Microsoft downplayed handwriting recognition in favor of "digital ink" as a new data type. This was a very wise decision.
Conrad Blickenstorfer is the publisher of the premier website on Rugged PCs, http://www.ruggedpcreview.com, and the long-time editor-in-chief of Pen Computing Magazine (http://www.pencomputing.com). He continues to be on the cutting edge of Rugged PC and Handheld Computing technology. This article may be disseminated on the Web providing the biographical blurb and the link to http://www.ruggedpcreview.com remains in place.

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Quote:
Pen Services for Windows 95
From Pen Computing #11 August 1996

Along with the launch of Windows 95 back in August of last year, Microsoft released Pen Services 2.0, the upgrade from Windows for Pen Computing. Of course, outside of the beta releases of Win95, the Pen Services 2.0 cannot be found on the Win95 disks or CD, and Microsoft sells Pen Services only to OEMs and not to the general public.
It took about five months before the first OEMs released Pen Services 2.0 (PS 2.0), which coincidentally was the same time a company called Annabooks announced the availability of Pen Packs. A Pen Pack is a license of PS2.0 meant for smaller OEMs and value-added retailers, but again not for the general public.
The only option that the end user with an older pen machine has is to contact the manufacturer for an official release of PS 2.0, along with a driver that works with their machine. Right now I know of these machines and tablets with official releases: the Compaq Concerto, the Fujitsu Stylistic series (contact Fujitsu at 408-764-9400 or 800-831-3183), Mutoh/Kurta tablets and the DTR-1. Anyone with a copy of the Win95 Beta will find on it drivers for GRiD pen computers and three Wacom tablets, as well as a slightly buggy one for the Concerto. Check my web site at for latest information.
What's new in Pen Services 2.0?
Actually, the first thing one notices is what is missing, namely gestures. Those special squiggles that performed delete, cut, copy, paste, edit, and other operations are absent from the new Pen Services 2.0. In their place is a combination of an odd looking horizontal arrow button that appears underneath the cursor, and the redefined use of the circle-around-letter feature.
The under-arrow, as I call it, can be dragged to select a range of text, or clicked to bring up a menu of options including cut, copy, paste, and inserting spaces and tabs. For example, where before a single sideways L gesture could add a space, with the under-arrow it is now necessary to click it, then click insert, and then click on space. Unfortunately, it only appears in Win95 programs-older 16 bit apps do not show the under-arrow in their dialog boxes.
Microsoft says they have replaced the old squiggle gestures with the circle around a letter feature (which they now call gestures-see related web document). In the on-line help documentation (Start/Help/Using a Pen/Becoming a Pen Expert) the new circle-around-letter gestures are explained. For example, the circle-S gesture will now insert a space. But the user-configurable feature that was in Windows for Pen where a sequence of keys could be tied to each circle-around-letter gesture has been lost in PS 2.0.
One really neat feature that has been added is the lasso. It is a cousin of the circle-around-letter gesture, only with a dot or period. Except in this case, you draw the circle first, surrounding text or graphics you want to select, then tap in the middle to make the dot. The result is that everything circled is marked as selected-much easier than dragging the under-arrow. But the accuracy is a bit lacking, and it doesn't work in the "fixed" version of MS Word (see below).
Also missing in PS 2.0 is a fully functional pop-up keyboard. Although the new keyboard has three different styles and different sizes, there are no function keys, nor an escape, home, end, page up, page down, insert, or delete key. In Windows for Pen it was possible to use the pop-up keyboard to run any DOS program in a window, but with PS 2.0 you'll need to attach a keyboard.
Remember the recognition training program that allowed instantaneous correction as well as inspection of each character in the database? Well, that's been redesigned as well. The new training program asks the user to write in a preset sequence of words, much like a first grade writing test, which it uses to invisibly adjust the database. There is no option to train an individual character, nor to review the database to find a particularly bad scribble that is causing problems. This new method may actually be considered easier to use by some, but I sorely miss the control the old program had over the recognition database.
PS 2.0 adds to the standard Win95 dialog a big "A" button that is used to pop-up an editing window with an optional keyboard. It is much like the text edit box brought up by the check mark gesture under Windows for Pen, but Microsoft has added a few interesting features here: clicking on a letter brings up a number of possible alternatives to replace it. And when in keyboard mode, extra buttons under the text show possible words to finish off what is being typed.
Since Microsoft removed so many of the really neat features that were in Windows for Pen, the big question is whether PS 2.0 is actually better. The answer is going to be up to each individual user, how they use the pen, and what they need to run. All around, I'm upset with the lost functionality: the quick squiggles to cut and paste and add a space, a screen that didn't have under-arrows and alpha buttons cluttering up input boxes, and the ability to run absolutely any program (windows or DOS) with the pop-up keyboard when I had left my real keyboard on the other side of the building.
I agree with Microsoft's claim that the new recognizer (called GRECO) works better than the old one (MARS), but because I can't seem to get it trained accurately to my writing like I could before, I don't make as much use of it. I won't go back, but it's mostly because all the other features of Win95 have made my computing life much easier and I refuse to give them up.
With PS 2.0, I can still use my pen, and it's still better by far than any other mouse alternative. But with the total redesign of the pen interface, it's not the delight it used to be to operate without a keyboard.
Microsoft Word and the Pen
The original release of Word 7.0 for Win95 did not support Pen Services. Recognition did not work within a Word document, although it did work from dialog boxes. And the Pen Annotation mode did not work at all. Microsoft claimed this was a bug, and in April of this year released Word 7.0a with a fix for it. However, even the fix has a bug: the capability to right-click a misspelled word that has been underlined in red has been misplaced somehow. Otherwise, writing and annotating documents with the pen works again, other than the differences introduced with PS 2.0. Also, the under-arrow does not appear in a Word document, so the new circle-around-letter gestures must be used instead. To get a copy of the update, not available on the Internet due to size, contact the Microsoft Order Desk at 800-360-7561.
In my opinion, the fact that it took Microsoft more than seven months to correct this problem, and that they allowed it to happen in the first place, is good evidence of how seriously committed Microsoft really is to Pen Computing.
CIC Handwriter on Fujitsu Stylistic
For their Stylistic series, Fujitsu has elected to augment PS2.0 with the Handwriter Recognition System from Communication Intelligence Corporation (http://www.cic.com). This replaces the Microsoft recognition engine, training program, and configuration dialog, but leaves the same keyboard and pen input dialogs. Most importantly, CIC has kept the gestures from Windows for Pen, and left out the odd-looking under-arrow (the menu can still be brought up with a 'right click').
There are a few quirks where old gestures don't always work right with new 32-bit applications (such as undo and edit in Word 7a), but it makes Win95 much easier to use with the pen. Combined with a noticeably better recognition engine, and a well designed training program, the Handwriting software makes the Fujitsu the best Win95 pen platform I've seen yet. Maybe CIC will consider selling an add-on package for other machines such as the Concerto.
Installing Pen Services 2.0
Once the urge to move to Windows 95 is too great to ignore, installing Pen Services 2.0 can be accomplished without tearing one's hair out if a few simple guidelines are followed:
1) Obtain Pen Services 2.0 the installation package from the OEM. This can be from a web site, or ask the manufacturer to send a disk in the mail.
2) Back up your machine. This is pretty obvious, but is extremely important.
3) Plug in a Microsoft compatible mouse. This is needed for the normal installation of Win95, and allows the pen driver installed later to hook in and replace the mouse driver.
4) Do not install Win95 over the top of the existing Windows 3.x directory. This causes problems where old drivers conflict with Win95. Instead, either remove everything from the hard disk and reload from scratch, or rename the old windows directory (use the dos command move windows windows.old) and install Win95 to a 'new' directory C:\Windows. If reinstalling from scratch, have a copy of the install disk 1 from Windows 3.x ready for the upgrade check.
NOTE: many windows programs (especially ones supporting OLE) will not work until re-installed under Win95.
5) Put a copy of the \Win95 directory from the CD-ROM on the hard drive. This makes the installation run faster, and leaves the .CAB files on the hard drive for installing printer and PCMCIA drivers later.
6) Install Win95 by running SETUP.EXE from the \Win95 directory. This takes a while, so get a cup of coffee or a Snapple or something.
7) Once complete, Win95 will reboot the computer. After selecting the correct time zone and installing a printer, the Win95 desktop appears. Select the Start button, then Settings/Control Panel. In the Control panel, double click on Add/Remove Programs and press the Windows Setup tab. Click the HAVE DISK button, and select the floppy or directory containing the drivers from the OEM. A dialog should appear listing Pen Services for Windows 95. Click the box to the left of it to select it and press OK. Win95 will install the Pen Services and drivers, then warn that the machine must be rebooted. Click OK on this message and do a Start/Shut Down, then select Reboot the Computer and click on Yes.
8) After the system reboots, a dialog should appear titled Pen Driver Configuration. Pull down the list of different models, select the appropriate driver for your machine, and press OK. Then reboot once again.
9) The mouse pointer should now respond to the pen, and the mouse is now useless and can be disconnected. Continue to set up Win95 as desired.
10) To enable the suspend feature on the menu, do a Start/Settings/Control Panel. Then double click the Power icon, and set the Show Suspend option to Always. To suspend the computer, now use the suspend option that appears on the start menu above shutdown instead of a hardware switch on the machine.
11) To enable the 32-bit PCMCIA drivers, do a Start/Settings/Control Panel. Then double click on the PC Card icon and follow the instructions.
12) For certain machines, such as the Concerto, some Win3 based configuration utilities may still be useful in Win95. In this case, put those programs and dll's in a separate directory and create shortcuts to them on the desktop and/or start menu.
- Scott Griepentrog
Scott Griepentrog is a contract programmer who specializes in real-time software and internet programming, and has a web site at http://stg.net that supports Windows based Pen machines. He is currently working with Pentek, a company that manufacturers conveyors (no affiliation with pens) where he develops and debugs custom process control software with the aid of several Concertos and a Proxim RangeLan2 network.

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Sorry for the long post, but, I just felt your reply was a little on the arrogant side.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 4:05 am 
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Quote:
while the Dauphins and PC98, used a touchscreen and stylus.


Actually not. Dauphins use electromagnetic pens too. (I have a DTR-1, therefore I know it from first-hand.)


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