This is what happens to your hard disks when you thump them

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Andy
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This is what happens to your hard disks when you thump them

Post by Andy »

Yes, ok, so I got in a bad mood the other day and thumped my storage server very hard. This was the result. 0% fitness but still 100% performance... Odd.

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Post by Rhade™ »

In the past, on my defect WDC Drive i had the same SMART state - 100% performance and bad fitness - okay what have I done ? As I was a stupid n00b - I removed the power connector of the Harddrive ( not intentionally ) like Hotplug ( My OS wasuUp and Winamp played music )

Then as I know what I have done - I pluged the Connector to the Harddrive ( Hotplug ) and my HDD maked thy typical " click " sound - after I rebooted my system I had no problems but the fitness was bad.

After 4years ( october 06 ) the drive just say good bye with the " click " Sound and now its in the Harddisk heaven. damn mistake . . .

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Post by Andy »

4 years isnt a bad lifespan for a hard disk. Im guessing mine should last the same in this state.

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Post by empireum »

Hmm, I had a Seagate drive that got its power connector unplugged a good 10 times (or even more) while the PC was running (evaluating RAID-1/-5 configurations). No problems. I did not plug the drive back in until the PC was shut down, however. Everything went as expected including array rebuilding.

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Post by Rhade™ »

Oh i forgot it was an IDE Drive

The given lifespan are 100years an more right ? 4years is very bad, thats right. I have a friend who buyed a WDC 500GB Sata drive, after 2 weeks it was dead ( click click . . . ) he saved his website projects for his customers. He cant nothing to do, Drive was failed -_-

We in Germany called this " monday production "

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Post by Andy »

Hard disks don't have any where near 100 years lifespan! They have a manufacturer warranty of 1 or 3 years (depending on the company). They're only designed to last around 3 years.

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Post by empireum »

Yep, 100 years is pretty unrealistic. They have a given MTBF (mean time between failures) of some 100,000 or 1,000,000 hours (don't remember exactly, but somewhere in that range).

Seagate has a 5-year warranty on its drives (all of them, not only SCSI ones) , one reason I prefer them, even although they are pricier (hope that's the right word) than other drives.

As for the lifespan, I did have some really old 40 or 50MB 5.25" MFM drives (kinda IDE's predecessor) that were built in the 80s, and they were still working when I tried them the last time, they were >15 years old.

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Post by Rhade™ »

Whats the lifetime of a good SCSI Drive ?

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Post by Andy »

Rhade™ wrote:Whats the lifetime of a good SCSI Drive ?
It depends how you treat it. Keep its temperature stable and use it averagly and it should last many years. However don't keep it cool and use it rough and it won't last long at all. Id say on average 3 years for any drive.

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Google and others

Post by RentedMule »

Google and others have released reliability reports on their massive amounts of hard drives. The biggest suprise to some people is that the life of a SCSI drive is no different than the life of an IDE drive.

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Post by Andy »

I made a topic on this some time ago about the temperature. SCSI disks are simply faster than IDE drives because they spin faster, 10k or 15k as appose to 7.2k.

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Post by Rhade™ »

a good SCSI Drive cost very much - and then the lifetime of it will be only 3 years . . .

Cost - Use - O - Meter

Cost <--[-]-------------> Use -_-

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Post by Andy »

No the average drive, averagely used with an average temperature will last around 3 years. Keep that drive in good condition, eg, defrag it so its not working so hard, keep its temperature stable at around 20*c and it will last much longer.

SCSI is going out of fasion in most applications now anyway as they are being replaced by SATA. Only high speed devices need SCSI now. For everything else IDE or SATA is fine.

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Post by Gnome »

hi what about WD HDD with the temp 0'c ?

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Post by Andy »

The temp is not 0*c the sensor simply isnt working.

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Post by Rhade™ »

Andy wrote:No the average drive, averagely used with an average temperature will last around 3 years.
Okay i miss understand you.

but scsi are builded for drives with 24h 7days in week uptime. I dont belive that the normal sata ide drives are builded or designed for this. But it works fine - scsi or not scsi thats the question

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Post by Andy »

All drives are designed with continuous use in mind since the manufacturer doesn't know how its going to be used. The server on which this site is hosted uses standard off the shelf drives. Never had a problem in the two years its been online. Not one failure. They're all on 24/7 and always will be until they fail.

SCSI is great for lots of data transfer but SATA is slowly creeping up on these transfer rates. Id only recommend SCSI if you were going to use a very high traffic server or if it was a database server.

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Post by constrictor »

i have a backup harddrive that lasted 8 yrs
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Post by Gnome »

Andy wrote:The temp is not 0*c the sensor simply isnt working.
nope it true
its my storage server ive got rack caddies fans in the frount fans in the back

better start backing up your hdd andy

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Post by moonlit »

toshua123 wrote:
Andy wrote:The temp is not 0*c the sensor simply isnt working.
nope it true
its my storage server ive got rack caddies fans in the frount fans in the back

better start backing up your hdd andy
I don't think I believe that, I'm not sure it's possible to get a HDD to 0'C using only air cooling...

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Post by empireum »

It's impossible (at least with any fan that would fit inside a PC case or inside such a rack caddy) to reach temps that are (substiantially) sub-ambient because all a fan does is move the air, so the lowest temperature you could get is the air temperature, which is ambient. So unless your ambient temp is 0°C, no way to have an air-cooled HD at this temp.

You are talking complete nonsense.

sonicexcess

Post by sonicexcess »

I've been lucky to get 2 years out of a HDD. They just dont last.

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Post by Andy »

empireum wrote:It's impossible (at least with any fan that would fit inside a PC case or inside such a rack caddy) to reach temps that are (substiantially) sub-ambient because all a fan does is move the air, so the lowest temperature you could get is the air temperature, which is ambient. So unless your ambient temp is 0°C, no way to have an air-cooled HD at this temp.

You are talking complete nonsense.
Exactly what I would have said.

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Post by empireum »

Thanks.

Sorry if the post sounded a bit harsh, but this is annoying when people post such cr*p.

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Post by Andy »

empireum wrote:Thanks.

Sorry if the post sounded a bit harsh, but this is annoying when people post such cr*p.
It wasnt harsh, it was totally true, and absolute in every detail. Just think, some people will learn from it.

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