BetaArchive Logo
Navigation Home Database Screenshots Gallery Image Uploader Server Info FTP Servers Wiki Forum RSS Feed Rules Please Donate
UP: 60d, 2h, 23m | CPU: 16% | MEM: 5158MB of 12191MB used
{The community for beta collectors}

Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 42 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 10:20 am 
Reply with quote
Permanently Banned
Offline

Joined
Tue Jun 10, 2014 5:09 pm

Posts
491

Favourite OS
Longhorn 3718
x010 wrote:
Besides , non-metro apps are (mostly)pretty difficult to use on non-stylus Windows tablets.
The best example of this would be File Explorer itself. Wonder why Microsoft did not introduce a metroized version of File Explorer for Windows 8x?


oh you gotta be kidding me

scalable icons up to 256px, single window without tree, breadcrumbs + back-forward buttons
which btw they did in "8"

oh wait... THAT WAS EVEN BACK IN LONGHORN DAYS !

if you can't pinpoint 256px icon then touch isn't for you


Top  Profile
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 11:15 am 
Reply with quote
FTP Access
Offline

Joined
Thu Jun 13, 2013 4:46 pm

Posts
980
wasabilee wrote:
x010 wrote:
Besides , non-metro apps are (mostly)pretty difficult to use on non-stylus Windows tablets.
The best example of this would be File Explorer itself. Wonder why Microsoft did not introduce a metroized version of File Explorer for Windows 8x?


oh you gotta be kidding me

scalable icons up to 256px, single window without tree, breadcrumbs + back-forward buttons
which btw they did in "8"

oh wait... THAT WAS EVEN BACK IN LONGHORN DAYS !

if you can't pinpoint 256px icon then touch isn't for you

I cannot understand what you are trying to say clearly.
Yeah , I can scale File Explorer up to 256px , but selecting things is quite difficult. Using a mouse , I can quickly use CRTL and select with no issues , but on tablet it is a hit-or-miss.
Scaling does not fix this problem in any way - otherwise it is not too bad at all.


Top  Profile
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 11:35 am 
Reply with quote
Donator
User avatar
Offline

Joined
Mon Jul 23, 2012 9:40 pm

Posts
1143

Location
Flying high in a DC10

Favourite OS
NT3.X Family
@x010:
I think he's trying to say that he believes a lot of the innovations in Win8 existed in Longhorn. But I think you already got that, though.

_________________
Quote:
"C makes it easy to shoot yourself in the foot; C++ makes it harder, but when you do it blows your whole leg off"


Last edited by yourepicfailure on Mon Jul 27, 2015 11:46 am, edited 2 times in total.

Top  Profile
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 11:43 am 
Reply with quote
Donator
Offline

Joined
Sat Feb 24, 2007 4:14 pm

Posts
6612

Location
United Kingdom

Favourite OS
Server 2012 R2
wasabilee wrote:
Tom as much as i respect you in some areas
i just don't figure out people who love .net

Quote:
Almost all of the system apps in Windows 10 are C++, for example.

gee I wonder why


.NET is a very good trade-off between high-level language and performance. You can bitch and moan, and demand everything be done in assembly, but it'd be very harmful to progress. It's very much about using the right tool for the job. For performance-critical system applications, you'd use C++; for higher-level things, something like C# very much makes sense. It's still pretty decent in terms of performance, certainly orders of magnitude closer to native than many other similarly high-level platforms. High-level brings advantages. It speeds up the development of an application, it makes it easier to reliably test, which reduces bugginess and particularly can avoid many security pitfalls.


Scaling icons to 256px is neither here nor there. I will agree that it's very difficult to do certain tasks in Explorer with touch. Somethings aren't so bad, but others are horrible.

_________________
BuildFeed - the ultimate collaborative NT build list - Windows Longhorn - a look at a defining Microsoft project


Top  Profile  WWW
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 1:14 pm 
Reply with quote
Donator
User avatar
Offline

Joined
Sun Dec 30, 2007 8:12 am

Posts
1210

Location
Brisbane, Queensland

Favourite OS
OS/2 Wrp 3.0
A lot of the stuff on the metro interface are internet things, and often don't display until they downloaded their guff.

Some have access to materials that ye may have downloaded, such as music players, or pdf readers. On the other hand, speed is not the sort of thing that the metro interface needs, nor do most of its proggies.

I can run metro apps on the desktop, with Stardock's "ModernMix". So you can really resize the metro window, but some apps are designed for fat fingers, and having icon-sized buttons goes down as well as having tiny numbers on an ATM.

You also have to consider that on portable machines, the screen is being mauled and rotated even when you are not using it, say carrying it across the room to show someone. The black border helps, but you have to make the interface robust to that too.

The real problem with metro is that microsoft insists ye use their internet logon services to get into your box. I mean, what do you do when the power is out, or the router is down.

Classic shell allows you to have wallpaper in metro. I'm not sure about microsoft's interface, since that is usually the first to go. You create an icon on the metro interface to restart classic shell, and that's the end of it.

One should understand that words like 'modern', and 'user-friendly' age horridly quickly. One only needs to look at IBM's "advanced technology" 286 PC's to understand this. Or 'PS/2'. My brother knows of someone who "scored" a PS/2 for 2000$, on the hope of getting a play-station/2, rather than a personal-system/2.

Unfortunately Norton does the same with 'ghost', which is either binary's hack or powerquest's entirely different thing.


Top  Profile  WWW
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 1:34 pm 
Reply with quote
Donator
Offline

Joined
Sat Feb 24, 2007 4:14 pm

Posts
6612

Location
United Kingdom

Favourite OS
Server 2012 R2
os2fan2 wrote:
The real problem with metro is that microsoft insists ye use their internet logon services to get into your box. I mean, what do you do when the power is out, or the router is down.


The last successful authentication result is cached, so it'll still let you log in without an internet connection.

You can avoid it for the most part - I refuse to log in with a Microsoft account myself. Individual apps on an as-needed basis, sure. But the whole account with syncing? No thanks. In Windows 10, the only app that flat out refuses to work unless you login to your computer with a Microsoft account is Cortana.

os2fan2 wrote:
I can run metro apps on the desktop, with Stardock's "ModernMix". So you can really resize the metro window, but some apps are designed for fat fingers, and having icon-sized buttons goes down as well as having tiny numbers on an ATM.


Windows 10 is a lot better in this respect. The new design language places far less emphasis on oversized icons and typography, and far more emphasis on scaling to the screen resolution and size. This has been backed up with better APIs to help make this the default way to do Windows 10 applications.

I too used ModernMix on my desktop, because full-screen applications on a 28" 4k screen is just ridiculous.

_________________
BuildFeed - the ultimate collaborative NT build list - Windows Longhorn - a look at a defining Microsoft project


Top  Profile  WWW
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 1:54 pm 
Reply with quote
Donator
User avatar
Offline

Joined
Sat Aug 19, 2006 8:13 am

Posts
2016

Location
Slovenia, Central Europe.

Favourite OS
Windows 98 SE 4.10.2222B
hounsell wrote:
Firstly, compatibility. A common API for all hardware vendors to implement, a common API for all software vendors to consume. Secondly, security. Allows the OS to potentially filter any malicious requests far easier and with a smaller performance penalty than other methods.

Except Metro goes beyond that and tries to lump mobile/touch devices and desktop computers into the same API. And I restate that to me, that makes as much sense as making a vehicle that can drive on both roads and railroads. Of course, you can make one but it will underperform on both as to support both it will have to make compromises, which will make it perform worse than a vehicle specifically optimized for either type of way.

Quote:
I'm not actually sure what you say is entirely true anyway. I do believe that Metro apps can communicate direct with hardware anyway, at least to some degree, so as to enable companion apps for peripherals.

Well, maybe. I don't know, never went much into the inner workings of Metro.

Quote:
Regarding performance, I don't know what the last build you used is, but that's something that's steadily improved with each and every release, and 10240 was another jump forward in this regard (probably came from cutting some of the extra logging/debugging/tracking in the Insider builds).

I last used 10147, and even there, say, the clock that shows up when double-clicking the time on the taskbar, took a while to show up, while in Windows 7 it shows up instantly.

Quote:
Probably one of the more exciting things for Windows 10 is that legacy apps will be able to be repurposed and packaged into the store system. That looks like it'll be great news for users, a strong compromise that allows us to give some of the benefits (package management, some of the sandboxing) to legacy apps for a minimal cost.

So once again, as it has been happening for years, removing choice from the power users (as we don't have the choice of installing the legacy versions) for the sake of making the OS better for the newbies. Why not just use the current paradigm that you described, for the Home editions, while giving the users of the Professional editions more choice.

Quote:
.NET is a very good trade-off between high-level language and performance. You can bitch and moan, and demand everything be done in assembly, but it'd be very harmful to progress. It's very much about using the right tool for the job. For performance-critical system applications, you'd use C++; for higher-level things, something like C# very much makes sense. It's still pretty decent in terms of performance, certainly orders of magnitude closer to native than many other similarly high-level platforms. High-level brings advantages. It speeds up the development of an application, it makes it easier to reliably test, which reduces bugginess and particularly can avoid many security pitfalls.

No, criticism, no matter how harsh, can only be beneficial to progress as it makes sure progress is done right and for the benefit of everyone. Progress needs to be taken scientifically, by constantly questioning it and seeing if it holds up to latest research. Not religiously, by worshipping whatever "innovation" is put out without question and telling all critics to just "shut up and adapt".

_________________
Join #softhistory @ RoL IRC, a nice community for true enthusiasts!
Anime channel: #doki-doki @ RoL IRC, Mibbit, KiwiIRC.
The 86Box help channel is #softhistory now!

Check out our SoftHistory Forum for quality discussion about older software.


Top  Profile  WWW  ICQ  YIM
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 2:15 pm 
Reply with quote
FTP Access
Offline

Joined
Thu Jun 13, 2013 4:46 pm

Posts
980
Battler wrote:
hounsell wrote:
Firstly, compatibility. A common API for all hardware vendors to implement, a common API for all software vendors to consume. Secondly, security. Allows the OS to potentially filter any malicious requests far easier and with a smaller performance penalty than other methods.

Except Metro goes beyond that and tries to lump mobile/touch devices and desktop computers into the same API. And I restate that to me, that makes as much sense as making a vehicle that can drive on both roads and railroads. Of course, you can make one but it will underperform on both as to support both it will have to make compromises, which will make it perform worse than a vehicle specifically optimized for either type of way.

The compromises required to do that is not too much. Yes , there are differences between the two , but not in the way that you are imagining. Metro adapts to this reasonably well , and it saves developers a great deal of time.

But yes , I am not sure as to how Windows Phone will exactly adapt on 10-inch tablets/desktops. If we end up getting non-optimized tablet apps , then there could be a problem...
Battler wrote:
Quote:
Regarding performance, I don't know what the last build you used is, but that's something that's steadily improved with each and every release, and 10240 was another jump forward in this regard (probably came from cutting some of the extra logging/debugging/tracking in the Insider builds).

I last used 10147, and even there, say, the clock that shows up when double-clicking the time on the taskbar, took a while to show up, while in Windows 7 it shows up instantly.

This I would agree with you. It takes at least 1 second for me , and if the computer is running in full load , it may never come up , not even the Start menu or Wi-Fi network list, forcing a restart on my part.
Battler wrote:
Quote:
Probably one of the more exciting things for Windows 10 is that legacy apps will be able to be repurposed and packaged into the store system. That looks like it'll be great news for users, a strong compromise that allows us to give some of the benefits (package management, some of the sandboxing) to legacy apps for a minimal cost.

So once again, as it has been happening for years, removing choice from the power users (as we don't have the choice of installing the legacy versions) for the sake of making the OS better for the newbies. Why not just use the current paradigm that you described, for the Home editions, while giving the users of the Professional editions more choice.

I do not get you clearly here.
As for legacy apps , since Home and Pro share the same codebase , for Microsoft to offer such an option would look a little odd to me. Though , it is probably workable.


Top  Profile
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 4:30 pm 
Reply with quote
Donator
Offline

Joined
Sat Feb 24, 2007 4:14 pm

Posts
6612

Location
United Kingdom

Favourite OS
Server 2012 R2
Battler wrote:
Except Metro goes beyond that and tries to lump mobile/touch devices and desktop computers into the same API. And I restate that to me, that makes as much sense as making a vehicle that can drive on both roads and railroads. Of course, you can make one but it will underperform on both as to support both it will have to make compromises, which will make it perform worse than a vehicle specifically optimized for either type of way.

Sharing an API is a very good idea. Sharing implementation or sharing the design is less clear cut, but Microsoft have made plenty of changes to mitigate the issues that plagued Windows 8. Indeed, it's far more similar in concept to how responsive websites work now. And they work very well. I certainly don't buy the idea that you can't have a common API between Mobile and Desktop, and the world today proves you wrong.

Battler wrote:
Well, maybe. I don't know, never went much into the inner workings of Metro.

This strikes me. I always try to be at least somewhat informed on what I discuss.

Battler wrote:
I last used 10147, and even there, say, the clock that shows up when double-clicking the time on the taskbar, took a while to show up, while in Windows 7 it shows up instantly.

As I said, 10240 improves things again. As always, hardware will be a factor, though my Surface Pro 3 has no lag. Drivers is probably a significant factor too, some of the graphics drivers in particular are still a bit rough.

Battler wrote:
So once again, as it has been happening for years, removing choice from the power users (as we don't have the choice of installing the legacy versions) for the sake of making the OS better for the newbies. Why not just use the current paradigm that you described, for the Home editions, while giving the users of the Professional editions more choice.

Using the store infrastructure is, of course, still optional. Updates for apps are not forced - You can disable automatic application updates, though obviously, it's enabled by default because that is what the overwhelming majority of users will desire. It's a setting in the Store application. You can sideload application packages, and this has been much simplified in Windows 10.

Battler wrote:
No, criticism, no matter how harsh, can only be beneficial to progress as it makes sure progress is done right and for the benefit of everyone. Progress needs to be taken scientifically, by constantly questioning it and seeing if it holds up to latest research. Not religiously, by worshipping whatever "innovation" is put out without question and telling all critics to just "shut up and adapt".

Erm, I was simply explaining that there was a place for higher-level platforms like .NET. At no point did I say people must use them, only that there are numerous advantages to doing so, and while this is the case, people will use them.

_________________
BuildFeed - the ultimate collaborative NT build list - Windows Longhorn - a look at a defining Microsoft project


Top  Profile  WWW
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Mon Jul 27, 2015 9:42 pm 
Reply with quote
FTP Access
Offline

Joined
Sun Jul 21, 2013 7:38 am

Posts
208

Favourite OS
9431
First, scaling. Metro uses XAML, which can easily scale to fit the high-res screen today.
Second, animation, which make the OS more fluid and comfortable.
Third, Adaptive UI and Universial apps.
Forth, Security. Because metro apps are running in sandboxes, they can hardly damage the system.
As for the performance issue, metro apps in Windows 10 is much faster than it in 8.x, but still a bit slow when compared with desktop apps.


Top  Profile
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Thu Aug 20, 2015 4:13 pm 
Reply with quote
Offline

Joined
Thu Aug 20, 2015 2:53 pm

Posts
33

Favourite OS
Windows 2000
I really hate it when you can only play MKV files in Win8.1 in the metro video app. Metro apps seem like a really cheesy way of getting things done...


Top  Profile
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Thu Aug 20, 2015 11:42 pm 
Reply with quote
Staff
User avatar
Offline

Joined
Thu Oct 11, 2007 9:13 pm

Posts
2027

Location
United States

Favourite OS
MacOS 9.2.2
darthbreakout wrote:
I really hate it when you can only play MKV files in Win8.1 in the metro video app. Metro apps seem like a really cheesy way of getting things done...


...Get VLC?

_________________
James *~*~* BA Moderator | Alternate History writer


Top  Profile
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Fri Aug 21, 2015 9:55 pm 
Reply with quote
Donator
User avatar
Offline

Joined
Sat Aug 19, 2006 8:13 am

Posts
2016

Location
Slovenia, Central Europe.

Favourite OS
Windows 98 SE 4.10.2222B
hounsell wrote:
Using the store infrastructure is, of course, still optional. Updates for apps are not forced - You can disable automatic application updates, though obviously, it's enabled by default because that is what the overwhelming majority of users will desire. It's a setting in the Store application. You can sideload application packages, and this has been much simplified in Windows 10.

1. Something that is enabled by default and requiring the PowerShell to actually uninstall (ie. remove the files), and then it breaks half the UI when you do so, is not something I'd call optional. Also, over here, most people are perfectly fine with traditional desktop applications. My mother is pretty much a computer layperson, doesn't know much, and yet she never uses the store. She only uses desktop applications. And I know many others like her, and they seem to be the majority here, and I'd suspect elsewhere too.
2. The "Universal" versions of certain programs (such as Calculator) are the only versions available, and there is no way to switch back the "universalized" parts of the UI back to the non-"universalized" ones, even though those are still in the code (and used by Windows Server). There used to be a way, until Microsoft deliberately removed it. So essentially, they haven't learned from Windows 8.x and are still resorting to the same old trick of going and deliberately removing ways to reenable what they don't want you to use.
This to me is plainly rigging the market, as instead of keeping the workaround in, and letting people enable the non-"universalized" UI if they so wish, and seeing which is preferred by the market, they make sure there is only one UI. It's like making a referendum without the options you don't want people to vote for, just so you can then boast an artificially high approval of your desired outcome. This tactic backfired in Windows 8, and it will backfire in Windows 10.

And it seems like the successor to Windows 10 is going to be even worse. They messed with syscall, which means probably the vast majority of old software is now completely broken.

_________________
Join #softhistory @ RoL IRC, a nice community for true enthusiasts!
Anime channel: #doki-doki @ RoL IRC, Mibbit, KiwiIRC.
The 86Box help channel is #softhistory now!

Check out our SoftHistory Forum for quality discussion about older software.


Top  Profile  WWW  ICQ  YIM
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Fri Aug 21, 2015 10:02 pm 
Reply with quote
FTP Access
Offline

Joined
Thu Mar 29, 2012 4:14 pm

Posts
1237
Battler wrote:
2. The "Universal" versions of certain programs (such as Calculator) are the only versions available, and there is no way to switch back the "universalized" parts of the UI back to the non-"universalized" ones, even though those are still in the code (and used by Windows Server). There used to be a way, until Microsoft deliberately removed it. So essentially, they haven't learned from Windows 8.x and are still resorting to the same old trick of going and deliberately removing ways to reenable what they don't want you to use.
This to me is plainly rigging the market, as instead of keeping the workaround in, and letting people enable the non-"universalized" UI if they so wish, and seeing which is preferred by the market, they make sure there is only one UI. It's like making a referendum without the options you don't want people to vote for, just so you can then boast an artificially high approval of your desired outcome. This tactic backfired in Windows 8, and it will backfire in Windows 10.
Server uses modern calc. It's not as much of a deliberate fallback removal than a simple move to a platform that has better scaling awareness and is easier to maintain.


Top  Profile
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Fri Aug 21, 2015 10:18 pm 
Reply with quote
Donator
User avatar
Offline

Joined
Sat Aug 19, 2006 8:13 am

Posts
2016

Location
Slovenia, Central Europe.

Favourite OS
Windows 98 SE 4.10.2222B
Lukas Marsik wrote:
It's not as much of a deliberate fallback removal than a simple move to a platform that has better scaling awareness and is easier to maintain.

Microsoft is a multi billion dollar company that can easily hire more people to help maintain stuff. It's not a small one-man company that barely scrapes enough to survive. And last time I checked, the customer was always right.

_________________
Join #softhistory @ RoL IRC, a nice community for true enthusiasts!
Anime channel: #doki-doki @ RoL IRC, Mibbit, KiwiIRC.
The 86Box help channel is #softhistory now!

Check out our SoftHistory Forum for quality discussion about older software.


Top  Profile  WWW  ICQ  YIM
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Sat Aug 22, 2015 11:11 am 
Reply with quote
Donator
Offline

Joined
Sat Feb 24, 2007 4:14 pm

Posts
6612

Location
United Kingdom

Favourite OS
Server 2012 R2
Battler wrote:
Lukas Marsik wrote:
It's not as much of a deliberate fallback removal than a simple move to a platform that has better scaling awareness and is easier to maintain.

Microsoft is a multi billion dollar company that can easily hire more people to help maintain stuff. It's not a small one-man company that barely scrapes enough to survive. And last time I checked, the customer was always right.


But unless they'd turn a profit, it's not worth it. If a developer team of 25 can be reduced by 20 by moving to an easier to maintain platform - not unreasonable - or even more likely, can be maintained by developers that specialise in a more widely used platform, meaning lower wages, and probably an even bigger cut than 20% in costs across the aforementioned 25 man team, then they're not going to waste money just to please a minority group.

The "customer is always right" thing has always been nonsense in any engineering-type job - you'd know this if you had any meaningful commercial experience in such an industry. Even so, I suspect a good 99% of customers don't care whether the calculator app is old school Win32 or a modern Universal app. Only that it calculates.

_________________
BuildFeed - the ultimate collaborative NT build list - Windows Longhorn - a look at a defining Microsoft project


Top  Profile  WWW
 PostPost subject: Re: Is there any real benefit of a Metro app over a desktop        Posted: Sat Aug 22, 2015 1:15 pm 
Reply with quote
Donator
User avatar
Offline

Joined
Sat Aug 19, 2006 8:13 am

Posts
2016

Location
Slovenia, Central Europe.

Favourite OS
Windows 98 SE 4.10.2222B
hounsell wrote:
But unless they'd turn a profit, it's not worth it. If a developer team of 25 can be reduced by 20 by moving to an easier to maintain platform - not unreasonable - or even more likely, can be maintained by developers that specialise in a more widely used platform, meaning lower wages, and probably an even bigger cut than 20% in costs across the aforementioned 25 man team, then they're not going to waste money just to please a minority group.

So basically to put more money into the rich guys' pockets at the expense of the poor man. Also, the inherent problem with this reasoning is this thought that a lavish lifestyle is Nadella's and Aul's human right and heavens forbid they reduce their own income to accomodate their customers, without whom they wouldn't have their high income anyway.
Edit: And of course, all this in the biggest economic crisis since 1929, with unemployment on the rise worldwide. Trying to cure a crisis involving unemployment by laying off more people and reducing more useful expenses while maintaining useless expenses such as over the top salaries of the top 10% in the company, is as effective as trying to cure a fever by turning on the heating.

Quote:
The "customer is always right" thing has always been nonsense in any engineering-type job - you'd know this if you had any meaningful commercial experience in such an industry.

The only reason it doesn't work is because the IT sector has become incredibly corrupt. In a healthy market, customers could work with their wallet. Say, if a car manufacturer decided to introduce breaking changes in their cars every few years, and in addition installed a hidden camera with an "option to reasonably disable it" in every car to spy on people, people would stop buying their cars until their concerns were addressed. But in the IT sector, this is made impossible by OS manufacturers doing everything to push other software developers to follow OS support cycles and drop OS'es as the OS manufacturers say they should. This means people have this increasing push to keep updating and therefore can't really vote with their market.
Especially now in the days of the Internet, where you even have websites constantly adopting all the latest technology, requiring constant browser upgrades, which require almost constant OS upgrades too as the list of supported OS'es by a browser changes.
Imagine if radio stations kept changing their modulation, requiring people to constantly upgrade their car radios, and that in turn requiring regular car upgrades because of car manufacturers making breaking changes in car radio connecting systems as well as pressuring car radio manufacturers in every way they legally can to only support the last few car models. There would be an uproar soon. The only reason there isn't one in the IT sector is because the IT sector's primary target userbase, North Americans and West Europeans, is still reasonably well off to be able to afford the regular hardware upgrades that regular OS upgrades require.

_________________
Join #softhistory @ RoL IRC, a nice community for true enthusiasts!
Anime channel: #doki-doki @ RoL IRC, Mibbit, KiwiIRC.
The 86Box help channel is #softhistory now!

Check out our SoftHistory Forum for quality discussion about older software.


Top  Profile  WWW  ICQ  YIM
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 42 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2




Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

All views expressed in these forums are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the BetaArchive site owner.

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group

Copyright © 2006-2020

 

Sitemap | XML | RSS