Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

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TuneableSumo876

Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by TuneableSumo876 »

> I realize that I may be replying to some very old posts here.

If you want a lightweight version of Ubuntu, try Lubuntu. It's basically the Ubuntu base with LXDE as the desktop environment, and can run easily on older systems, such as that Dell Optiplex with 128MB RAM and Windows XP you sometimes see in libraries or relatives' houses.

I personally use it on my Linux VM since it offers the best performance out of all Ubuntu distributions-- although that's probably partially due to the fact I'm used to LXDE, since the first actual Linux computer I used was a Raspberry Pi (I had only used Linux VMs before), and they came with LXDE as the default desktop environment when I bought mine.

Similarly, a version of Ubuntu exists called Xubuntu if Xfce is more your thing.

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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by Sword7 »

In 1980s, I was mainframe user with DECsystem10 and VAX systems through my college life. I have good knowledge with VMS, Ultrix and TOPS-10 operating systems. I am more interested with UNIX system because it is more easy to write programs than other OSes. I started with Ultrix system with Internet access on VAX system while I was student.

In mid 1990s, I started with Slackware distros on PC desktops. I downloaded disk images and initialized 50+ blank diskettes!! That took several hours to complete. Later I bought CD-ROM writer for my PC, that was much easier and faster to burn ISO images than blank diskettes!

Later I finally switched to Redhat and SUSE to replace slackware to save a lot of my time to make diskettes every release. Today I am using Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora Core, FreeBSD and NetBSD. I use Ubuntu as primary OS for general purposes and programming.

I recommend Ubuntu for Linux system and FreeBSD or TrueOS for BSD system.

There are many different kinds of Ubuntu distros. That's why I prefer Ubuntu over other Linux distros.

oscareczek
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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by oscareczek »

Sword7 wrote:There are many different kinds of Ubuntu distros. That's why I prefer Ubuntu over other Linux distros.
But I can say exactly the same about Debian, live versions are in 6 flavours: Gnome, KDE, LXDE, XFCE, Cinnamon and MATE – Ubuntu doesn't even have Cinnamon version. They haven't given up with i386, which can be sometimes useful. Most importantly, it's considered more stable than Ubuntu (which is a flavour of Debian itself). Why ubuntu then?

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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by AlphaBeta »

Who needs flavors when you have a package manager that you can use to install many great desktop environments by just typing a single command?
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Sword7
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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by Sword7 »

oscareczek wrote:
Sword7 wrote:There are many different kinds of Ubuntu distros. That's why I prefer Ubuntu over other Linux distros.
But I can say exactly the same about Debian, live versions are in 6 flavours: Gnome, KDE, LXDE, XFCE, Cinnamon and MATE – Ubuntu doesn't even have Cinnamon version. They haven't given up with i386, which can be sometimes useful. Most importantly, it's considered more stable than Ubuntu (which is a flavour of Debian itself). Why ubuntu then?
Yes, that is right. I know that. Ubuntu offers cinnamon version by installing desktop environment on shell prompt after installation. You can switch between desktop versions at login screen. Ubuntu is based on Debian. Linux Mint offer Cinnamon desktop and based on Ubuntu. I prefer x64 version for full memory access above 4 GB.

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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by Sword7 »

AlphaBeta wrote:Who needs flavors when you have a package manager that you can use to install many great desktop environments by just typing a single command?
Yes, Ubuntu supports multi-flavors by installing additional desktop environment and switch between desktop versions at login screen.

oscareczek
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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by oscareczek »

So then, what is the real reason you prefer ubuntu?

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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by Sword7 »

oscareczek wrote:So then, what is the real reason you prefer ubuntu?
You can google 'Debian vs Ubuntu' for more information. Both are very similar but some differences. Ubuntu offers PPAs (personal package archives) for individual developers but Debian do not have. Also Ubuntu is better for beginners and more user friendliness and corporate feel but Ubuntu is less stable than Debian. I am using both as current. That's why I prefer Ubuntu for additional PPA software packages from some developers for auto updates but many developers offer latest deb packages for both. That is up to you for choosing Debian or Ubuntu.

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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by AlphaBeta »

Sword7 wrote:
AlphaBeta wrote:Who needs flavors when you have a package manager that you can use to install many great desktop environments by just typing a single command?
Yes, Ubuntu supports multi-flavors by installing additional desktop environment and switch between desktop versions at login screen.
Pretty much every distro supports that. Switching between session configurations is a desktop manager thing, so that is not really a operating system feature.
Sword7 wrote:
oscareczek wrote:So then, what is the real reason you prefer ubuntu?
You can google 'Debian vs Ubuntu' for more information. Both are very similar but some differences. Ubuntu offers PPAs (personal package archives) for individual developers but Debian do not have. Also Ubuntu is better for beginners and more user friendliness and corporate feel but Ubuntu is less stable than Debian. I am using both as current. That's why I prefer Ubuntu for additional PPA software packages from some developers for auto updates but many developers offer latest deb packages for both. That is up to you for choosing Debian or Ubuntu.
Ubuntu's PPA system is not bad if you want to use some applications not found in the official repositories and still want to enjoy the advantages of using a package manager. However, I am not very fond of using PPAs for installing cutting edge versions of desktop environments - you might as well install a rolling release distro if you feel the urge to run the latest Gnome and/or Plasma as soon as it gets released.

I prefer the Arch's AUR system for a couple of reasons, mainly because unlike PPAs where you need to add an entire repository from which you then install some packages, in AUR you deal directly with the packages, which can of course depend on another AUR or official repo packages. It feels much more integrated and united than PPAs, where the developer pretty much has to include everything not in the official Ubuntu repositories, which can lead to package conflicts where more PPAs offer mutually incompatible versions of the same package. On the other side, unlike PPAs which distribute already compiled packages, the AUR only distributes the metadata ("pkgbuild") that is required to create the package, which includes the location of source files, the actions to be done and of course information about the package and that is then processed by the "makepkg" utility, which automatically downloads the files, installs any dependencies, executes the actions and creates the package in one go. It still requires you to download this "pkgbuild" file and create the package (which some custom package manager wrappers do even automatically), compared to adding the PPA to apt. Both have their advantages.
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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by courtscrystal »

Arch and i3 is a very nice combo for single monitor setups and lightweight PCs, as long as you spend some time ricing it and getting a nice customized theme. pacman drives me a little crazy sometimes, but having access to the AUR is worth it. Usually.
If you've got multi monitors (2 or more) than you can't beat Gnome 3 in terms of workflow. When you wanna multitask, that's where it's at. My favorite noobie Linux is Manjaro with Gnome. It just works so well. The GUI tools for kernel updates and such can be really nice for a new user.
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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by daemonspudguy »

Ubuntu, Sabayon (Gentoo based), Debian, Fedora, Arch Linux, Manjaro, and openSUSE.
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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by pentiumpro »

I am running openSUSE for years and really like it. I use FVWM as window manager and prefer the Leap version over the Tumbleweed one.

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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by honey »

Slackware was my first Linux (0.98). Then I switched to SuSE - as I had no real internet connectivity and the whole SuSE on 6CDs gave me all important packages. Then I moved to Debian and currently use:

- debian as the server platform
- debian or kubuntu on workstations (and MacOS on the most often used laptop)
- kali linux (debian based) for security-related work
- raspbian on RPi
- IRIX on SGI machines :-)

In the meanwhile, I've used many other distros (redhat, PLD linux), but I'm always going back to vanilla Debian - stable, doesn't try to be smarter than you, no surprises included.

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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by MCpillager12 »

Debian; i heard it is very lightweight and uses only around 200-300 mb ram idle.
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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by Exemptus »

Debian testing all the way. It is very stable, despite the "testing" tag. I liked Arch for a good while but just not for production - the rolling updates broke things on ocassion and I had to spend time rolling back. Never had any problem with Debian, and it allows me to tinker with the things I need to. But many do, so these days is all a matter of personal taste and suitability for your use case.

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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by rbshep »

I would personally say Ubuntu MATE. Or the MATE version of MINT, if you're that way inclined.

MATE is a relatively lightweight DE, and Ubuntu MATE in particular has a nice 'Welcome' app to help new users with some basic tasks. The only thing missing from their default setup is a panel layout that is Windows 7-10 style, but that can be fixed by using the 'Redmond' layout, and changing the 'System Monitor' item on the panel for the 'Dock Applet' one. Oh it also supports the XScreenSaver screensavers too ;)

If for some reason you're using 32bit x86, i'd say Debian with MATE. And if you're trying to run Linux on a newworld powe mac, The Void Linux distro is your only real choice nowadays. I chose the glibc version (instead of the musl one) for my powerbook as it means i can run the UXP browser ported by wicknix (his builds target debian).

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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by elch01 »

I use Parabola, the system is built on arch but is "libred" so it fits my power user needs.
I prefer XFCE but recently ive been looking into MATE or LXDE.
Uhh.. no?

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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by SintezQ »

Debian have enough useless programs for me. I recommended arch linux for desktop and middle-expierence linux users. there is not many application and just clean operating system. you can draw your desktop as you need and you can

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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by sergiaws »

I could try Ubuntu. I see it similar to Windows as it is possible, and it's the distro which have more accessibility. I think it could be a good replacement for Windows.

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Re: Your Linux/BSD distribution and recommendations?

Post by JennyTheOSCollector »

If you're a Windows user that cannot decide which Linux/BSD distribution to try first,I recommand you to try Linux Mint Debian Edition,because it has similar interface to Windows.If you are going to work on Linux/BSD distribution,I suggest you to give Debian a try.It's really a stylish and popular Linux distro.If you are going to try a Red Hat Linux distro,I suggest you to try CentOS,because though RHL distros are almost the same,CentOS is more stylish.And BSD distros?Try FreeBSD first!
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