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Non bootable bin files (apple mac os 6.0.2-7.5.2 Greek Lang)

Posted: Sun Oct 06, 2019 9:36 pm
by trenoparathyra95

Re: Non bootable bin files (apple mac os 6.0.2-7.5.2 Greek L

Posted: Tue Oct 08, 2019 8:22 am
by Neptruo314
Try renaming it to .img. That might help.
Alternatively, try searching somewhere other than the database.

Re: Non bootable bin files (apple mac os 6.0.2-7.5.2 Greek L

Posted: Mon Oct 14, 2019 9:01 am
by yksoft1
Try use Stuffit Expander.
If Stuffit Expander extracts it to unbootable disk images, they are probably Disk Copy 6.x Compressed disk images or self-mounting disk images that cannot be stored in non-Mac filesystems. You will have to extract them in Classic Mac OS or Mac OS X.

Re: Non bootable bin files (apple mac os 6.0.2-7.5.2 Greek L

Posted: Mon Jan 20, 2020 7:12 am
by trenoparathyra95
This program works for windows that I can find and how exactly do I export the files? i have a macbook air will it help to do it better than windows?

Re: Non bootable bin files (apple mac os 6.0.2-7.5.2 Greek L

Posted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 1:55 am
by rbshep
Use 'The Unarchiver' app or the macbinary command in the terminal to decode the BIN files back to plain disk image files.

https://macintoshgarden.org/forum/manag ... e-terminal

If they are a straight dump of the floppy disk, then Mini VMac should be fine with them once decoded.

I would suggest opening them in Disk Utility, but apparently modern macOS only supports HFS+ these days, not HFS. If they are MFS you're definitely out of luck mounting them on anything modern (I think 7.5.x was the last system to support this format).

Re: Non bootable bin files (apple mac os 6.0.2-7.5.2 Greek L

Posted: Mon Apr 13, 2020 4:11 am
by ardweebno
rbshep wrote:Use 'The Unarchiver' app or the macbinary command in the terminal to decode the BIN files back to plain disk image files.

https://macintoshgarden.org/forum/manag ... e-terminal

If they are a straight dump of the floppy disk, then Mini VMac should be fine with them once decoded.

I would suggest opening them in Disk Utility, but apparently modern macOS only supports HFS+ these days, not HFS. If they are MFS you're definitely out of luck mounting them on anything modern (I think 7.5.x was the last system to support this format).

Actually, before we start trying the gamut of archiving apps, we probably just need to look at the files themselves. If you can grab one of those files and get them to a Linux or OS X machine which has the CLI tool "hexdump" loaded, you can quickly see what those files are. To figure this out, run this command:

hexdump -C yourfile.bin

This tells hexdump to read in the file and covert the output to ASCII character data, which makes it easy to spot resource strings in the binary file. BinHex and Macbinary files have very specific headers at the beginning of the file, which makes it very easy to spot the file type.