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 PostPost subject: Standby Electronics... A Fire Hazard?        Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 10:54 am 
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I was informed by my mum that there was a ad on TV were a fire man said that alot of fires are caused by faults from computers, TVs, and other things left on standby and that at night everything should be switched of, That did make me wander if leaving my router, phone, computers, and all this other stuff in my room on at the wall while I sleep :? And my MySky-HDi box does get painfully hot,

Do you think that it is a fire hazard?


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 11:03 am 
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Definitely a fire hazard.
TV's especially.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 11:23 am 
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What's bad is that the MySky manual says specifically not to turn it off at the wall unless instructed by Sky


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 11:37 am 
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Might aswell turn off your Distribution Box at the same time, it's the biggest fire hazard.

Everything that is plugged into any power point regardless of what device it is, it will become a major fire hazard, regardless if it's a TV or if it's a little clock radio, they display the same danger.

It's up to you if you want to turn off the Standby devices at night, if you don't feel comfortable with having them left like that, then turn them off, it will bring you peace of mind when going to sleep at night, and plus you'll save a little on your power bill :).

(And yes, I know that devices such as TVs and Microwaves have HV Transformers in them.)

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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 11:46 am 
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But is it ok to turn the MySky off because the manual said not to


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 11:56 am 
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It should be fine to turn it off at night if you do wish so.

The recommendation that you don't is mainly because the initial burst of power that goes through a device when you flick the "On Switch" can cause a device to have a more then usual failure rate, or flat out just fail (not common, but it happens).

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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 12:03 pm 
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That reminds me of what I read in a 1999 Computer book, back then it was recommended to leave your computer on 24/7 because the surge wasn't to good for the old PSUs


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 1:05 pm 
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Some things are recommended to leave on because they take time to initialise, Sky boxes, modems and routers etc especially. Virgin Media recommend you leave it on because sometimes it can take hours to get sync'ed with the network.

Standby things also waste power. In our house 36watts is wasted off standby equipment. Thats about 16p/day. Add that up over weeks and months, and thats a lot of wasted money. So anything you're not going to use such as your TV, DVD player, Microwave (ours uses 3watts just displaying the clock...), Desktop Computer (mine uses 9watts when off...!), turn them off. You will save yourself a bomb.

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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 5:11 pm 
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I never unplug my computer from the wall, or turn it off at the wall, apparently the bios battery goes flat faster if you do. However I always turn my Monitor and speakers off

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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 5:49 pm 
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Shane wrote:
I never unplug my computer from the wall, or turn it off at the wall, apparently the bios battery goes flat faster if you do. However I always turn my Monitor and speakers off


Yeah but will you still be using the same box in 10 years? Doubt it.

Oh and those with your computers "off" - they're still using power, something has to respond to the power button


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 PostPost subject: Re: Standby Electronics... A Fire Hazard?        Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 8:14 pm 
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My sky box at home takes a about 30min to re download the epg when you fire it up after its turned of at the wall but my parents do it all the time when they go to bed so its kinda annoying. The most dangerous thing is probably a cheap PSU like in my PC as it could surge and a few caps could go starting a fire. My sky box gets really hot too they all do over here .

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 PostPost subject: Re: Standby Electronics... A Fire Hazard?        Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 9:03 pm 
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win98 wrote:
My sky box at home takes a about 30min to re download the epg when you fire it up after its turned of at the wall but my parents do it all the time when they go to bed so its kinda annoying. The most dangerous thing is probably a cheap PSU like in my PC as it could surge and a few caps could go starting a fire. My sky box gets really hot too they all do over here .


Mine takes ~3min to redownload the EPG, plus the initialization (~15secs).
I don't know why rarely it reboots on purely normal condition.


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 PostPost subject: Re:        Posted: Fri Dec 19, 2008 10:29 pm 
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happy dude wrote:
Shane wrote:
I never unplug my computer from the wall, or turn it off at the wall, apparently the bios battery goes flat faster if you do. However I always turn my Monitor and speakers off


Yeah but will you still be using the same box in 10 years? Doubt it.

Oh and those with your computers "off" - they're still using power, something has to respond to the power button


I am aware of that, I just prefer not to chance it in all honesty.

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 PostPost subject: Re:        Posted: Sat Dec 20, 2008 1:03 am 
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happy dude wrote:
Yeah but will you still be using the same box in 10 years? Doubt it.

Oh and those with your computers "off" - they're still using power, something has to respond to the power button
Technically that isn't true. My Macintosh LCII is dated 1992 and I still use it to this day, and it uses a "Switch" to turn it on and off. rather than a Power Button. The same goes for the monitor that goes with it. Because they don't have modern day Energy compliant technologies, they don't have such a thing as "Sleep" or "Standby" mode. I could be mistakened though, but who knows. lol.

I do know, however, that my old Power Macintosh G3 used to keep a constant charge when shut down unless I unplugged it. I could tell it did when it made this noise that sounded like it was turned off completely. I believe all gadgets are different. It just depends on if it is "grounded" or not.

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 PostPost subject: Re: Re:        Posted: Sat Dec 20, 2008 1:16 am 
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troyoda1990 wrote:
I do know, however, that my old Power Macintosh G3 used to keep a constant charge when shut down unless I unplugged it. I could tell it did when it made this noise that sounded like it was turned off completely. I believe all gadgets are different. It just depends on if it is "grounded" or not.

The G3 is a "soft-power" Mac, meaning the power button is not a switch but a button (if that makes sense - basically think of a switch as something where if you press it when the machine is not plugged into the wall, it will start up when you plug it in as the switch is in the "on" position, whereas a button as to be pressed when the machine has a power source or it does nothing). Soft-power Macs can be started up using the power button on the older Apple keyboards (or the power button on a monitor connected with an Apple Display Connector cable), whereas hard-power ones cannot, and hard-power ones will also display the "it is now safe to switch off your Macintosh" screen whereas soft-power ones simply switch off. Most PowerPC Macs and onwards were soft-power.


You may also remember seeing that old orange "It is now safe to switch off your computer" text upon sutting down a Windows 95-era PC - old AT PCs were hard-power and had to be manually "switched" off, whereas modern ATX PCs just turn off when you shut them down (but power stays in them for the power button to be active, some machines have an additional "hard" switch on the back like the Mac LC.


Even the G3 is 10 years old of course, yet still runs Leopard just like a new Mac :)

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 PostPost subject: Re: Re:        Posted: Sat Dec 20, 2008 1:27 am 
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Vista Ultimate R2 wrote:
The G3 is a "soft-power" Mac, meaning the power button is not a switch but a button (if that makes sense - basically think of a switch as something where if you press it when the machine is not plugged into the wall, it will start up when you plug it in as the switch is in the "on" position, whereas a button as to be pressed when the machine has a power source or it does nothing). Soft-power Macs can be started up using the power button on the older Apple keyboards (or the power button on a monitor connected with an Apple Display Connector cable), whereas hard-power ones cannot, and hard-power ones will also display the "it is now safe to switch off your Macintosh" screen whereas soft-power ones simply switch off. Most PowerPC Macs and onwards were soft-power.


You may also remember seeing that old orange "It is now safe to switch off your computer" text upon sutting down a Windows 95-era PC - old AT PCs were hard-power and had to be manually "switched" off, whereas modern ATX PCs just turn off when you shut them down (but power stays in them for the power button to be active, some machines have an additional "hard" switch on the back like the Mac LC.


Even the G3 is 10 years old of course, yet still runs Leopard just like a new Mac :)
Oh yeah! My Packard Bell back in 1994 was a Hard-Power machine as it did display that message all the time [or sometimes not at all...it would just freeze up. haha].

So would you consider leaving Hard-Power machines plugged in a fire hazard?

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 PostPost subject: Re: Standby Electronics... A Fire Hazard?        Posted: Sat Dec 20, 2008 1:41 am 
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Yeh, mine would sometimes freeze up on "Windows 95 is shutting down" - I think it was a bug in W95 of some sort as you often saw machines frozen there! I wouldn't consider leaving any machine plugged in to be a fire hazard, after all they wouldn't sell these things if they were and they could be sued for it (I tend to think people who unplug everything and all the rest of it are a bit paranoid :P)

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 PostPost subject: Re: Standby Electronics... A Fire Hazard?        Posted: Sat Dec 20, 2008 1:44 am 
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True...very true...I wouldn't unplug my refrigerator now would I? I only unplug certain appliances if I won't return to it for a while or to help with my family's electric bill. I mean, if I won't be using my Xbox for a while, what's the point of keeping it plugged in and showing the orange light? lol.

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 PostPost subject: Re: Standby Electronics... A Fire Hazard?        Posted: Sat Dec 20, 2008 1:54 am 
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troyoda1990 wrote:
True...very true...I wouldn't unplug my refrigerator now would I? I only unplug certain appliances if I won't return to it for a while or to help with my family's electric bill. I mean, if I won't be using my Xbox for a while, what's the point of keeping it plugged in and showing the orange light? lol.


the first time my 5 year old cousin saw an xbox he thought the ac adapter was the gaming system its so big lol.


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 PostPost subject: Re: Standby Electronics... A Fire Hazard?        Posted: Sat Dec 20, 2008 4:26 am 
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The 360 adaptor, theres like 5A or so going out of it, thats why the wire leading out of the transformer is thicker then the 240V wire leading in, Now that's what I call a fire hazard :P

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 PostPost subject: Re: Standby Electronics... A Fire Hazard?        Posted: Sat Dec 20, 2008 10:44 am 
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H'mm maybe I should keep my 360 unplugged I haven't used it for 3 weeks as I haven't bothered. (Turns round and unplugs 360) Another very dangerous thing probably more dangerous than generic PC PSU's thing is probably a CRT TV as CRT's have high voltage so a short can cause lots of smoke even if the short fires up the CRT somehow in standby also their power supplies are dangerous anyway too as they have to make the high voltage.

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 PostPost subject: Re: Re:        Posted: Sat Dec 20, 2008 11:01 am 
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troyoda1990 wrote:
happy dude wrote:
Yeah but will you still be using the same box in 10 years? Doubt it.

Oh and those with your computers "off" - they're still using power, something has to respond to the power button
Technically that isn't true. My Macintosh LCII is dated 1992 and I still use it to this day, and it uses a "Switch" to turn it on and off. rather than a Power Button. The same goes for the monitor that goes with it. Because they don't have modern day Energy compliant technologies, they don't have such a thing as "Sleep" or "Standby" mode. I could be mistakened though, but who knows. lol.

I do know, however, that my old Power Macintosh G3 used to keep a constant charge when shut down unless I unplugged it. I could tell it did when it made this noise that sounded like it was turned off completely. I believe all gadgets are different. It just depends on if it is "grounded" or not.


Indeed. My computer is made of totally modern parts, and I do shut it down when I don't use it, I never put my computer into standby mode, as it boots even from cold in about 45 seconds.

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 PostPost subject: Re: Standby Electronics... A Fire Hazard?        Posted: Sat Dec 20, 2008 11:15 am 
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mewrox99 wrote:
The 360 adaptor, theres like 5A or so going out of it, thats why the wire leading out of the transformer is thicker then the 240V wire leading in, Now that's what I call a fire hazard :P



There is a reason for that. 240v requires less current (amps) than 12v at the same power (watts) than the lower 12v does. Its all to do with this formula:
Quote:
P = I x V.

Power equals current multiplied by volts.

So, using the formula in several ways: 5A x 12v = 60watts... 60watts / 240v = 0.25A.

And that is why the lower voltage wire is thicker than the mains wire.

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 PostPost subject: Re: Standby Electronics... A Fire Hazard?        Posted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 12:08 am 
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Everything is a fire hazard if it uses electricity, CRT TVs hooked up to cable are probably the biggest problem. Cable signals tend to have grounding issues (up to 90V AC difference with the local ground), the tubes also run at high voltages.
High end amplifiers are also a risk, as well as laptop power-bricks.

OTOH a cheap chinese made cell-charger may have a higher risk of failure than a high-end PSU in a computer or expensive hi-fi system.

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 PostPost subject: Re: Standby Electronics... A Fire Hazard?        Posted: Sun Jan 04, 2009 8:33 am 
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I usually leave my plugs on, if I turn them off then I have to reset clocks and all-sorts. I turn them off if we are away from the house for more than a few days. I remember getting my Windows 98SE computer and being amazed at the fact it would shut-down it's self and not display that orange message.

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