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 PostPost subject: Best C Dev App and Enviroment?        Posted: Sat Sep 20, 2008 1:40 am 
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I have put it to myself to learn C, and I would like to know what OS would b best for Win32 development, and whats a good IDE, I have been told DevC++ is pretty good, but what about others?


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Sat Sep 20, 2008 2:28 am 
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GCC is your best bet for any type of development. Dev-C++, Code::Blocks, and any standard text editor would work. Add in MSYS if you eventually need to use autoconf/autogen.

Microsoft's C compiler is better on windows. I prefer it on Windows as it has better optimizers but only works on Windows, thus, to port any software you need GCC or Intel Compiliers.

Intel compilers are expensive but have much better optimizers among MacOS, Linux, and Windows. But as the name states, it's Intel and only works on Intel Processors. GCC works on over 32 different arch's and Visual C works on Intel, PowerPC, MIPS, and SPARC cpu's (depending on version).

If you're going to do GUI development, Qt is the best route. It works great and native on all major platforms (Win, Mac, and X11) and has easy to use syntax (unlike that Win32 API and MFC crap). GTK+ is also decent but doesn't fit in on Windows and works like [censored] on MacOS.

Feel free to PM me or send me an MSN message if you have any questions, or bug me on Freenode or EFnet (nick Zimmy on both).


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Sat Sep 20, 2008 2:42 am 
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does it have to be C or is C++ ok? if so, get vc++.... it is pretty nice, if you want to learn it.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Sat Sep 20, 2008 2:59 am 
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Ludacris wrote:
does it have to be C or is C++ ok? if so, get vc++.... it is pretty nice, if you want to learn it.


vc++ can support C in both the compiler and the IDE.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Sat Sep 20, 2008 4:09 am 
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i think ill grab VS2008 and Dev C++

thanks for the input


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Sun Sep 21, 2008 5:32 pm 
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If you;re a student, you can get it for free legitimately from MS through dreamspark.

channel8.msdn.com


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Sun Sep 21, 2008 6:39 pm 
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JollyRogers wrote:
If you;re a student, you can get it for free legitimately from MS through dreamspark.

channel8.msdn.com


Visual Studio 2005 Express is a hell of a lot more useful than any 2008 edition. Every version they increment up there going to push .NET more and more in every language, including Managed C++. If your doing a simple app yeah .net is perfect, but managed C++ should't even exist. If I'm doing any C/C++ it's because I want power, and while Microsoft provided power in C++ with WTL, MFC, ATL, and raw API, and still does to a lesser extent, it sucked. Instead of fixing up any normal API's for C they introduce .NET in it, like everything else, and I think if you find the need to fine tune anything written with .NET, you shouldn't be using .NET. .NET is just like java, it sucks and it's just as universal or maybe even more so than anal sex.

Im just rambaling on so i think im still some what high but like whatever.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Mon Sep 22, 2008 2:12 am 
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Ok, firstly, I AM a professional developer. I have used (and still use) everything from Visual C++ 6 to Visual Studio 2008... so please, I spend a LOT of time with these tools. Make your own informed decision, but don't just disregard what I say.

Visual Studio Express does not give you a dialog editor. Honestly, this IS what makes this environment worth using. Without it, you may as well use GCC/Emacs or any other "just a compiler + code editor".

Nextly, I have to say, visual studio 2008 is flat out broken. Off the top of my head, in 30 seconds, there are alignment issues with controls (due to dialog units vs. pixels) that get in your way that have never been an issue with any previous visual studio. And what I mean by that is, you can align the tops of 2+ controls and while their Y-axis values are the same in the resource file, visually, they don't actually line up. Also, when adding items to a listbox, it tends to add garbage charactors to the end of your list string, so you either crash your environment when trying to run the app in debug, or you end up with unexpected behavior when you actually see the items in the listbox. Also, it crashes... a lot. And the error is generally "Error in TODO: Put error description here". Yeah. Pretty stupid.

Personally, I like Visual C++ 6. I also get a lot of flak for it. It doesn't throw an exception on a failed 'new' call as defined by the C++ standard. Also, while it implements STL, it absolutely doesn't support bastardization of templates, which makes things like BOOST uncompilable. However, it has had 6 service packs, and about 10 years of support, so if you can get comfortable with its quirks, it can do everything you would want to do.

However, if you ever wish to target .NET, need BOOST, and really want standards compliance, stick with Visual Studio 2005.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Mon Sep 22, 2008 2:29 am 
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Mule, are you refering to the .res dialog editor or the windows forms designer? Last time I was messing around with resources in an app it was either VS 2003 or VC6, which I agree with you, VC6 is still great and will probably live on for quite a while, but while I don't use templates or STL I do notice from trying to get some ported software to compile under MSVC 6 fails more than trying to target 2003+. But anyway the one thing I noticed from brief time using VS 2008 is that the WinForms designer seems far more different than what originated from the early .NET and even VB to an extent.


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