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 PostPost subject: Engineering Windows 7: Follow-up on High DPI resolution        Posted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 6:51 pm 
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Now this is going to be useful. The post is long, I'm just pulling parts out of it again. Maybe it's just the mood I'm in, but I'm going to be commenting on how this post is ridiculous.

Source: http://blogs.msdn.com/e7/archive/2008/0 ... ution.aspx

Quote:
When we started windows 7 planning, we looked at customer data for display hardware, and we found something very interesting (and surprising). We found that roughly half of users were not configuring their PC to use the full native screen resolution. Here is a table representing data we obtained from the Windows Feedback Program which Christina talked about in an earlier post.


I can't believe that they didn't know (or were surprised) that most people don't run their LCD monitors at their native resolutions. Finally they'll come up with a solution to that problem.

Quote:
We don't have a way of knowing for sure why users adjust their screen resolution down, but many of the comments we’ve seen match our hypothesis that a lot of people do this to because they have difficulty reading default text on high resolutions displays.


What do you think their first thought was, "People must like to play with that slider bar in display properties"? I have 20/20 vision and I have to sit 1-1/2 feet away from some monitors myself. No [censored] it's because people are having problems reading the text.

Quote:
With that said, some users probably stumble into this configuration by accident; for example due to a mismatched display driver or an application that changed the resolution for some reason but did not change it back.


Personally, I've never had an application change the resolution on me unless it was a game... even if the game crashes out, 90% of the time the resolution changes back, if it doesn't all that's required is a restart of my computer. I work on computers and I've never run across someone whose screen resolution was changed by software. I can see how a missing display driver would do it, sometimes they get installed from Windows/Microsoft Update and break everything.

Quote:
Regardless of why the screen resolution is lower, the result is blurry text that can significantly increase eye fatigue when reading on a PC screen for a long period of time. For LCD displays, much of the blurriness is caused by the fact that they are made up of fixed pixels. In non-native resolution settings, this means that the system must render fractional pixels across fixed units, causing a blurred effect. Another reason for the relative blurriness is that when the display is not set to native resolution, we can’t properly take advantage of our ClearType text rendering technology , which most people (though not all) prefer. It is interesting to note that the loss of fidelity due to changing screen resolution is less pronounced on a CRT display than on an LCD display largely because CRTs don’t have fixed pixels the way that LCDs do.


Who is this? Changing the resolution on a CRT doesn't make it look worse. You lose fidelity because of the resolution in both LCDs and CRTs but that's not the issue here. The issue is that LCDs run ONE resolution. It's not just less pronounced, it just doesn't happen on CRTs, period.

Quote:
Another problem with running in a non-native screen resolution is that many users inadvertently configure the display to a non-native aspect ratio as well. This results in an image that is both blurry and skewed! As you can imagine, this further exacerbates the issues with eye strain.


Quote:
It turns out that there is existing infrastructure in Windows called “High DPI” which can be used to address this. High DPI is not a new feature for Windows 7, but it was not until Vista that the OS user-interface made significant investments in support for high DPI (beyond the infrastructure present earlier). To try this out in Vista, rt. Click desktop -> personalize and select “Adjust Font Size (DPI)” from the left hand column. Our thinking for Windows 7 was that if we enable high DPI out of the box on capable displays, we will enable users to have a full-fidelity experience and also significantly reduce eye strain for on-screen reading. There is even infrastructure available to us to detect a display’s native DPI so we can do a better job of configuring default settings out of the box. However, doing this will also open up the door to expose some issues with applications which may not be fully compatible with high DPI configurations.


I don't understand why they are talking about high-DPI issues. I figured that this post was going to be about solving the problems that have been around forever. There shouldn't be any issues with programs not supporting high-DPI configurations. Any application should work and look exactly the same in a high-DPI configuration as it does with the standard font sizes. This has been an issue in Windows from the beginning. Is it really that hard for a huge corporation that specializes in computer software to make their own software work without causing applications issues? Developers don't want to need to do more testing of their applications.

Quote:
One of the issues is that for GDI applications to be DPI aware, the developer must write code to scale the window frame, text size, graphical buttons, and layout to match the scaling factor specified by the DPI setting. Applications which do not do this may have some issues. Most of these issues are minor, such as mismatched font sizes, or minor layout artifacts, but some applications have major issues when run at high DPI settings.


DPI aware? The operating system can't just handle the scaling? Is there something I don't know? Why is this so difficult? Can't they just scale everything that's on the screen?

Obviously Windows wasn't built with LCDs in mind, but you would think they'd redesign it so that this isn't an issue anymore instead of putting patch on patch.

Quote:
Timing: is this the right feature for the market in this point in time?

Fortunately, we don’t have a “chicken and egg” problem. The hardware is already out in the field and in the market, so it is just a matter of the OS taking advantage of it. From a software perspective, most of the top software applications are DPI aware (including browsers with improved zooming, such as IE 8), but there remain a number of applications which may not behave well at high DPI. Another key piece of data is that display resolution for LCD panels is reaching the maximum at standard DPI. For these displays, there is no reason to go beyond 1900x1200 without OS support for high DPI because the text would be too small for anyone to read. Furthermore, this resolution is already capable of playing the highest fidelity video (1080p) as well as 2 megapixel photos. The combination of existing hardware in the field, future opportunity to unlock better experiences, and the fact that the hardware is now blocked on the OS and the software speak to this being the right timing.


I can't believe this is even posed as a question. The time was right YEARS ago. For the most widely used operating system in the world, a huge corporation, and tens of thousands of employees as developers, you'd think they'd be able to come up with something to solve this problem for good.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 9:09 pm 
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the resolution changes back to normal (from games) when you end task the proper processes.

they should just think LCD from vista on, Windows 7 isn't going to run on that pre-2000 computer, every new computer would be packed with an LCD or atleast people will buy one if it was sold seperately.

MS is drunk!


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Sun Sep 14, 2008 9:20 pm 
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I find it a ballache, that the machines at my college are all set to 1024*768, but the displays are 1280*1024. I have to manually set it each time I walk in.

And I have a slight sight problem. I fix that, though, by wearing glasses.

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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Mon Sep 15, 2008 9:03 am 
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Quote:
There shouldn't be any issues with programs not supporting high-DPI configurations. Any application should work and look exactly the same in a high-DPI configuration as it does with the standard font sizes.


Actually there are a heap of issues with programs not working properly with high-DPI configurations. For instance, if you have an app that's designed to run nicely on a 96dpi screen (which most are). It has toolbar buttons made up of bitmaps which are 16x16px. If you change the dpi to 120dpi, then to be the same physical size, the buttons have to be resized to 20x20px. This results in blurry, dodgy-looking icons.

If everything on the screen was a vector, then yes, scaling would be incredibly easy for the OS to do. However, because there are so many bitmaps everywhere (every icon, every picture file you look at, every logo...), scaling is difficult.

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