BetaArchive Logo
Navigation Home Screenshots Image Uploader Server Info FTP Servers Wiki Forum RSS Feed Rules Please Donate
UP: 6d, 15h, 43m | CPU: 11% | MEM: 1992MB of 3613MB used
{The community for beta collectors}

Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
 PostPost subject: Kaminsky reveals gaping hole in internet        Posted: Thu Aug 07, 2008 12:22 am 
Administrator
User avatar
Offline

Joined
Fri Aug 18, 2006 11:47 am

Posts
12407

Location
Merseyside, United Kingdom

Favourite OS
Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate x64
Kaminsky reveals gaping hole in internet

Quote:
After a four-week orgy of speculation, recrimination and warnings, Dan Kaminsky's domain-name system vulnerability has finally gone public. And boy, are we glad the net's overlords paid attention.

During an 80-minute presentation, Kaminsky for the first time gave a detailed analysis of a bug that threatened to bring chaos to the internet by poisoning the machines that translate domain names into internet protocol addresses. The director of penetration testing for security firm IOActive first warned of the threat on July 8, but withheld specifics out of concern that they would make it easier for miscreants to carry out attacks.

As other security researchers have publicly speculated, the DNS vulnerability stems from shortcomings in the way servers try to ensure IP address information comes from bona fide sources rather than those controlled by miscreants. To prevent tampering, DNS queries include a random transaction number. The response is only considered valid only if it contains the same number.

What Kaminsky discovered is that this safeguard can be easily circumvented because there are only 65,536 possible transaction IDs. By flooding a DNS server with multiple requests for a domain name with slight variations - for instance, 1.google.com, 2.google.com, 3.google.com and so on - an attacker can vastly improve the chances of reproducing the correct number.

"Because a bad guy can repeatedly cause these races to the same name server, he's eventually going to win," Kaminsky told a standing-room-only crowd.

Whereas the chance of guessing the correct transaction ID from a single query is 1 in 65,565, the odds improve considerably when an attacker floods a server with thousands of requests in a short burst.

The details were enough to satisfy us, and plenty of Black Hat attendees, that the past four weeks of handwringing was warranted.

"The fuss was justified from the perspective that this is an impactful finding that has the potential to bring down the internet," said Nitesh Dhanjani, a senior manager at Ernst & Young.

While many organizations have heeded Kaminsky's warning to patch, a disturbing number have yet to fix their servers. Among Fortune 500 companies, 15 per cent have yet to take any action, and another 15 per cent are still vulnerable to some extent because they use network address translation gear that prevents the patch from working.

Wearing his trademark blue jeans and black shirt and sneakers, Kaminsky laid out a plethora of ways miscreants could exploit the bug. Hitting mail exchange servers, it could be used to intercept or tamper with large organizations' email. It could be used alongside other attacks such as sidejacking and the manipulation of auto-update features in third-party applications.

"There are a ton of different paths that lead to doom," Kaminsky said.

While there has been only one confirmed attack using the flaw, Kaminsky suggested there likely were others.

"There's a lot of weird stuff floating around out there," Kaminsky said, referring to recent analysis of DNS traffic.

In the five months since he discovered the flaw, Kaminsky has shouldered considerable burdens in trying to get it addressed. He spent countless hours trying to marshal engineers from Microsoft, Sun Micro, and dozens of other companies. And he's endured criticism that he shamefully exaggerated the threat in a cynical attempt to drum up hype for his Black Hat presentation.

Given the huge sums being paid for unpatched vulnerability disclosures to widely used systems, we'd hate to think what might have happened if a less scrupulous person had stumbled on the bug first, or for that matter whether Kaminsky would be willing to undergo the same trials the next time he discovers a flaw of this magnitude.

"I might be," Kaminsky said. "I don't know if my girlfriend is. She's been giving me the please-don't-break-the-internet-again look." ®


Source and page with hyperlinks:
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/08/06 ... black_hat/

_________________
Image

BetaArchive Discord: https://discord.gg/epK3r6A


Top  Profile  WWW
 PostPost subject: Re: Kaminsky reveals gaping hole in internet        Posted: Thu Aug 07, 2008 1:26 am 
FTP Access
User avatar
Offline

Joined
Mon Aug 20, 2007 4:58 pm

Posts
274

Location
The Bermuda Triangle

Favourite OS
WFW 3.11/Win 98SE
Kaminsky wrote:
She's been giving me the please-don't-break-the-internet-again look." ®


He's broken the internet before?

joking aside, whats this mean? does it mean that someone can just hammer a server by typing in number after number, and eventually he/she will be able to create a senario where someone types google.com, but gets redirected to somewhere else?

_________________
Image


Top  Profile  YIM
 PostPost subject:        Posted: Thu Aug 07, 2008 10:49 am 
FTP Access
Offline

Joined
Sun Jun 01, 2008 9:59 am

Posts
23
Oh my God, he's broken the Internet before! [censored]! :D

(and yes, I know this look, but it's not the
Quote:
please-don't-break-the-Internet-again look
but it's the please-don't-break-our-PC-again look :P )


Top  Profile
 PostPost subject:        Posted: Thu Aug 07, 2008 4:15 pm 
FTP Access
User avatar
Offline

Joined
Thu Jun 19, 2008 1:02 am

Posts
66

Location
Dundee, UK

Favourite OS
Mac OS X Leopard 10.5.7
If any one person had the power to break the Internet that would be one powerful guy/gal ;)

With all these DNS vulnerabilities popping up what I find most surprising is how come no one has discovered these in the 20 odd years the current DNS implementation has been around?!


Top  Profile  WWW
 PostPost subject:        Posted: Thu Aug 07, 2008 10:31 pm 
Donator
User avatar
Offline

Joined
Fri May 18, 2007 9:39 am

Posts
953

Location
My house
IainK wrote:
If any one person had the power to break the Internet that would be one powerful guy/gal ;)

Whoever broke the internet would have to be an excellent hacker or a bomber. If they were an excellent hacker, they could hack the internet to not work. If they were a bomber, they could blow up all the ISPs around the world. Then no one would have access to the internet. ;)

_________________
Image


Top  Profile
 PostPost subject:        Posted: Fri Aug 08, 2008 5:48 am 
FTP Access
User avatar
Offline

Joined
Fri Sep 01, 2006 10:04 pm

Posts
1022

Location
The Ephemeral between existance and non-existance: AKA "being"

Favourite OS
Rhapsody, BeOS
Can't we just take down ICANN's headquarters?

Maybe send some gigantic voltage through the works telocommunications cable. Potentially so great it will not be stopped by fuses :D

_________________
Image
Part Time Troll - HPC Enthusiast - Spelling Master - Old Fart


Top  Profile  WWW
 PostPost subject:        Posted: Fri Aug 08, 2008 1:13 pm 
FTP Access
User avatar
Offline

Joined
Mon Sep 04, 2006 1:45 pm

Posts
732

Location
Norway

Favourite OS
HP keystroke RPL
P. sure they have filters to remove high-voltage signals on telephone lines, you might break a few switch-boxes nearby. Passing high-voltage through a fibre-optical cable would be tricky. Best bet for taking down the internet would IMO be to destroy various submarine cables beyond repair. Just using some depth-charges (those used against submarines in the old days) could probably take them out if you use enough (hitting something that deep would be tricky!) of them.

Or just use the proven IRA tactic of parking a van full of manure outside of the exchanges.

_________________
Let's sperg about hardware
E6410 - i5-560m, 8GB, WXGA+, NVS 3100M, Samsung SSD 830 128GB, WWAN, 9-cell, E-Port Plus Replicator
Desktop - i5-2500k (4.3 GHz TB), 8 GB, HD6950 2GB, 2x24" 1080p, Samsung SSD 830 128GB + 2 TB stripe, Xonar D2X


Top  Profile  WWW
 PostPost subject:        Posted: Fri Aug 08, 2008 10:39 pm 
Donator
User avatar
Offline

Joined
Mon Feb 12, 2007 12:50 pm

Posts
968

Favourite OS
First Edition UNIX
IainK wrote:
If any one person had the power to break the Internet that would be one powerful guy/gal ;)

With all these DNS vulnerabilities popping up what I find most surprising is how come no one has discovered these in the 20 odd years the current DNS implementation has been around?!


I'm sure that there are planty of people around who woud know how to take down the Internet; it's just a case of the software and hardware that'd be required.

_________________
Have a day.


Top  Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 8 posts ] 




Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

All views expressed in these forums are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the BetaArchive site owner.

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group

Copyright © 2006-2018

 

Sitemap | XML | RSS