Wireless USB Makes a Splash.!

New news and release discussion.
Locked
KenOath

Wireless USB Makes a Splash.!

Post by KenOath »

Interested in Wireless USB? Check out Certified Wireless USB kits from
D-Link and Iogear.

Cables connecting USB devices to PCs may soon disappear thanks to
Wireless USB, a short-range wireless communications technology
developed by nonprofit USB Implementers Forum Inc. (USB-IF), which
also developed the USB 2.0 standard.

Combining wireless and USB (Universal Serial Bus) connectivity, this
technology allows for high-bandwidth wireless data transfers between
PCs and USB devices like printers, scanners and portable hard drives.
A new set of peripherals based on the standard was introduced in July,
including Certified Wireless USB kits from D-Link Systems Inc. and
Iogear Inc.

Both kits come with a wireless USB adapter that wirelessly communicates
with a hub that holds multiple wired USB devices.
There are more than 2 billion wired USB installs globally, according to the USB-IF.
These kits are geared to serve them in addition to supporting full wireless
connectivity between USB devices.

As product lifecycles change, wired USB ports could be replaced by
Wireless USB chips embedded in hardware, said Jeff Ravencraft,
technology strategist for Intel Corp. and president and chairman of USB-IF.
Lenovo and Dell have already embedded Wireless USB chips in the
Inspiron 1720 and ThinkPad T61 laptops respectively.

Using UWB (ultrawideband) technology, Wireless USB devices can
communicate in a 10-meter range at up to 480M bps (bits per second).
Data transfers top out at two meters to three meters, with throughput
reaching 110M bps at 10 meters, Ravencraft said.

Data is transferred in the 3.1GHz to 10.6GHz spectrum and interference
with other wireless devices is minimal. "In a particular given spectrum
area, if there is conceived to be interference, the radio can turn off the
particularly segment of that frequency and use other bands to
communicate," Ravencraft said.

USB-IF is built on WiMedia Alliance's ultrawideband Common Radio
Platform. In addition to its own WiNet, WiMedia Alliance's radio platform is
also being implemented into Bluetooth Special Interest Group's Bluetooth
3.0 and 1394 Trade Association's Wireless 1394 wireless technologies.
UWB was approved for use in the U.S. in 2002, Japan and South Korea in
2006, and Europe in March 2007, according to a WiMedia Alliance
spokeswoman. Canada is reviewing UWB and China is under
development, she said.

"The high data rate of the UWB wireless technology will enable
consumers to transfer audio, video, and large data files from USB
peripherals to their PCs more efficiently," A.J. Wang, D-Link's chief
technical officer, said in a statement.

The goal was to make Wireless USB as easy to use as wired USB,
Ravencraft said. "Wireless USB was designed by the same companies
that defined Hi-Speed wired USB," he said. Future iterations of the
technology will boast higher speeds and better ways to associate a device
with a host.

In the meanwhile, early adopters can drool over the Certified Wireless
USB kits from D-Link and Iogear.

D-Link's take on Wireless USB

D-Link's UWB DUB-9240 Wireless USB Kit comes with a USB hub and
adapter, which allows multiple USB devices to connect wirelessly to a PC.
A plug-and-play Wireless USB adapter plugs into a PC's USB port, and
communicates wirelessly with a USB hub that holds up to four wired USB devices.

A wizard allows users to connect peripherals to a PC easily.
By adding a wired USB hub, the ports can be expanded to accommodate
more devices, the company said.
The kit will be available later this year for US$219.99.

The company will also separately ship the $119 DUB-2240 4-port
Wireless USB Hub and the $119 D-Link DUB-1210 Wireless USB adapter
later this year.

Iogear's Wireless USB chip shot

Iogear has jumped into the Certified Wireless USB field with the Wireless
USB Hub and Adapter Kit, which enables high-speed, wireless
connectivity between USB devices and PCs.
The kit comes with a hub and a dongle -- much like D-Link's wireless USB
kit -- but it can connect to three PCs.

After plugging in the Wireless USB adapter, software that comes with the
kit generates an encryption key, which is also transferred to the hub's
firmware. The hub and dongle identify each other by matching the
encryption key. Once the devices match up, the user is shown the
peripherals attached to the hub.

The hub can be used between three machines.
Machine-switching is possible by pressing a button on top of the hub, said
Bryan Wells, senior product marketing manager at Iogear.

The kit has been certified both by USB-IF and the U.S. Federal
Communications Commission, Wells said.

The $199.95 kit will ship later this year.
The company will also ship independently ship a Wireless USB Hub and
Wireless USB Adapter, both for $99.95, later this year.

Source

blahsucks-two
FTP Access
Posts: 112
Joined: Thu Oct 05, 2006 2:21 am

Post by blahsucks-two »

Isn't Bluetooth growing to fill that space? It looks like we could be seeing a Bluetooth vs. WUSB spat soon.

fzajac
User avatar
Donator
Posts: 1432
Joined: Thu Aug 31, 2006 2:45 pm
Location: UK
Contact:

Post by fzajac »

blahsucks-two wrote:Isn't Bluetooth growing to fill that space? It looks like we could be seeing a Bluetooth vs. WUSB spat soon.
WUSB will be quicker than Bluethooth, i think...

blahsucks-two
FTP Access
Posts: 112
Joined: Thu Oct 05, 2006 2:21 am

Post by blahsucks-two »

If WUSB is going to be 480Mbps, Bluetooth 3 is supposed to use the same tech to reach similar speeds. Right now, we already have a huge lineup of Bluetooth stuff, so I'm not excited about adopting WUSB.

Skyfrog
User avatar
FTP Access
Posts: 35
Joined: Wed Jul 25, 2007 6:45 pm
Location: United States

Post by Skyfrog »

blahsucks-two wrote:Right now, we already have a huge lineup of Bluetooth stuff, so I'm not excited about adopting WUSB.
True, but there's a whole lot more USB stuff. As I understand it you can use any of your existing USB devices wirelessly by connecting it to the wireless hub. Wireless hard drives perhaps? Sounds very interesting.

blahsucks-two
FTP Access
Posts: 112
Joined: Thu Oct 05, 2006 2:21 am

Post by blahsucks-two »

If this is played right, I suppose we could be seeing far superior NAS solutions. Wireless camcorder connections? Still, Bluetooth is built into things. If this requires a hub, that may shoot down the portability aspect of wireless.

oreissig

Post by oreissig »

Why do most blueooth devices stick with less than 1mbit/s while the very first CWUSB specification reaches 480MBit?
What is different in CWUSB in comparison to bluetooth that it enables such high data rates out of the box?

Frozenport
User avatar
FTP Access
Posts: 1022
Joined: Fri Sep 01, 2006 10:04 pm
Location: The Ephemeral between existance and non-existance: AKA "being"
Contact:

Post by Frozenport »

i am not quite sure what you mean but, bluetooth devices need to not only recieve data but also to process it.
For example, my cellphone recieves data @ ~48kb/s while my bluetooth network can do something ike ~100kb/s, this is because the data must also be processed....

Personally, I am not a big fan of bluetooth because it doesn't have the range, speed, nor reliablity that I need...
Image
Part Time Troll - HPC Enthusiast - Spelling Master - Old Fart

empireum
Donator
Posts: 3557
Joined: Sat Sep 30, 2006 5:00 pm

Post by empireum »

Frozenport wrote:Personally, I am not a big fan of bluetooth because it doesn't have the range, speed, nor reliablity that I need...
ACK.

ZSS9393
FTP Access
Posts: 124
Joined: Tue Jun 19, 2007 11:04 pm
Location: In front of a Thinkpad
Contact:

Post by ZSS9393 »

Wireless USB+ Thinkpad power= the exact reason I like Thinkpads.
<Completely>
Thinkpads have always been innovative. From the first Thinkpad, to this new Thinkpad T61. The ACPI standard wouldn't mean anything if IBM wouldn't have adopted it years ago. Actually, the laptop business wouldn't be here today if it wasn't for IBM and Apple's many innovations. Note that IBM's made more innovations, but who's counting?
</Completely>
http://ubuntu.com
^Ubuntu 8. New installer. Why the heck didn't they do this years ago?

Jeff
User avatar
Donator
Posts: 1004
Joined: Mon Sep 04, 2006 1:06 pm
Location: USA

Post by Jeff »

I personally cannot wait for Wireless USB. I would love to have a hub on my desk that isn't connected to my computer. (I already have enough wires...)
-Jeff

4tified
User avatar
Donator
Posts: 725
Joined: Sun Aug 05, 2007 4:16 am
Location: TeXaS

WUSB

Post by 4tified »

I worked at a company called WiQuest about 5 months ago that's currently working on a Wireless USB device called WiDV... it's an all-in-on workstation that supports Wireless Video Streaming, Wireless USB 1.1 and 2.0, wireless 802.11 A/B/G/N internet access, and wireless audio...al in one device. It's range is around 25 feet so far and you can walk into any room with Wireless Dock have streaming media in seconds. So far, this option is only being tested for laptops and there is a card that fits in the Mini PCI-express slot that syncs with the wireless dock. I can't wait to see this come out... Toshiba will be the the first vendor to have this product integrated into their notebooks and Microsoft has stated that Vista will be modified to support this third-party hardware. I kinda wish I still worked there.

ppc_digger
Donator
Posts: 590
Joined: Sat Aug 19, 2006 1:25 am
Location: Israel

Re: WUSB

Post by ppc_digger »

blahsucks-two wrote:If this requires a hub, that may shoot down the portability aspect of wireless.
I guess hubs are only meant for devices that don't have it built in and/or increasing range. I guess they could make them as small as regular USB connectors, so it'd be a non-issue.
4tified wrote:I kinda wish I still worked there.
Why did you leave?

Locked