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 PostPost subject: Windows Media DRM Cracked, Again        Posted: Mon Jul 16, 2007 8:39 pm 
The cat-and-mouse game continues between Microsoft and a group of
hackers intent on breaking the copy protection technology on its Windows
Media files. This time, an individual has cracked the latest DRM scheme
employed by Microsoft.

The back and forth began last August when a Doom9 forum user by the
name of "viodentia" released a program called FairUse4WM.
The application was able to strip the copyright protection from both audio
and video files, removing restrictions of where and when they could be
played.
Windows Media files could also then be converted into other formats as well.

Although many downplayed the potential risk of FairUse4WM due to the
complexity involved in using the application, it still posed a major
problem for Microsoft.
Because its primary music offerings are subscription based unlike Apple's
iTunes, users could potentially download the entire music libraries offered
by Napster or Yahoo and simply remove the DRM that makes the songs expire.

Microsoft jumped into action, issuing a patch for Windows Media and filing
a lawsuit last September against ten "John Does," including viodentia.

The Redmond company claimed that stolen Microsoft source code was
used to make corrections to FairUse4WM, a charge viodentia disputed in
public statements.

"FairUse4WM has been my own creation, and has never involved
Microsoft source code. I link with Microsoft's static libraries provided with
the compiler and various platform SDK files," the individual said.

An update for FairUse4WM was released to once again circumvent
Microsoft's latest restrictions, forcing the company to issue a second fix.
Such DRM patches are no easy task, as both providers of Windows Media
encoded content and customers must download new software.

Although Microsoft was unsuccessful in discovering the identity of
viodentia and gave up the lawsuit in April, the company was seemingly
able to stop further cracks from emerging. In the meantime, Microsoft
launched its Zune portable media player and Zune Marketplace store for
downloading music.

But the win didn't last long. On Friday, a user by the name of "Divine
Tao" -- an anagram of viodentia -- posted to the Doom9 forums
announcing a new tool that uncovers the keys from Microsoft's newest
Individualized Blackbox components used in its DRM.
Those keys can be then utilized by the existing FairUse4WM release to
strip the copy protection from patched versions of Windows Media.

According to responses to the forum post, the latest crack works on
Windows Vista and with songs encoded for Microsoft's Zune.
Even movie downloads from Vongo can be made DRM-free with the tool,
furthering the potential risk to Microsoft and its partners.

"This works fine for me with the very latest version of WMP on both XP
and Vista along with both Urge and Ruckus," one user replied.

Source.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Mon Jul 16, 2007 9:00 pm 
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This is kind of like the Vietnam war, and we're winning.

These company execs need to learn that access to media and making media impossible to copy are mutually exclusive goals. I frankly doubt that this will happen until most of these guys retire and let new people take over.

At least EMI (you know, that label with all those really good musicians) seems to get it.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Mon Jul 16, 2007 9:58 pm 
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Just imagine how much more they'll earn if they spend the enormous amounts of money they currently spend on DRM and lawsuits on marketing.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Tue Jul 17, 2007 3:54 am 
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The thing about Windows Media DRM is that no one cares about it. iTunes has the vast majority of the market even now, and it's still estimated to be only 1% on average of iPod music. I don't even use iPods or iTunes, but apparently there's been software to crack iTunes DRM for years (and they're releasing DRM-free tracks now, AFAIK), and Apple hasn't taken much action against them. Besides, you can burn those tracks to CD with Apple's permission, eliminating the DRM anyway. iTunes is still a huge success despite these things, while Windows Media DRM is in the minority despite its constant struggle.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Wed Jul 18, 2007 1:37 pm 
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Hackers hack. M$ can fight all they want, but you can't kill hacker pride.

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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Wed Jul 18, 2007 2:51 pm 
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what can i say, microsoft save your money and stop developing useless things.


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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Fri Jul 20, 2007 4:14 am 
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many lulz.

Microsoft should give up. Oh, wait, they never do![/u]

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 PostPost subject:        Posted: Wed Jul 25, 2007 6:03 am 
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I don't know why they even bother, it really makes no difference anyway. All of their protected songs are readily available in other formats already so it's not like they are really protecting anything. It's just inconveniencing honest consumers, nothing more. Plus it gives the hackers something to do, just a cat and mouse game like a previous poster said. They'd save a lot of time and money if they'd just give it up.


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