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 PostPost subject: 2 Physic questions        Posted: Sun Aug 02, 2009 6:42 pm 
Well, Ive got 2 questions to physic, that nobody could answer me yet.

The first one...

Imagine, you have a perfect vacuum, with really NOTHING inside in a glass box, and you shoot light through it, is it still a perfect vacuum? I mean, there is something inside then, photons, they dont have any mass, but theyre there.


The 2nd one...

Why are big masses attract each other? Yes, Einstein said it was a bending in spacetime, quantumtheory says its gravitons hidden somewhere in weird higgs-bosons and Newton said something very different. But it doesnt matter which one is right, of if anyone of these are right, or if I missunderstood them at all, is there a just very easy explanation why they behave like that? I mean, ... lets say...
- = vacuum (space)
s = sun
e = earth

s--------------------------------------e

Theres nothing that could carry the gravity, if spacetime is bent, thats different of course, but its still not really easy to understand for me.

Can someone explain those things for me? Ive asked a lot of different persons in different forums, but everybody says, at least to the 2nd one, there is no clear answer. I dont really believe that.

Thanks


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 PostPost subject: Re: 2 Physic questions        Posted: Sun Aug 02, 2009 7:04 pm 
Namronia wrote:
Well, Ive got 2 questions to physic, that nobody could answer me yet.

The first one...

Imagine, you have a perfect vacuum, with really NOTHING inside in a glass box, and you shoot light through it, is it still a perfect vacuum? I mean, there is something inside then, photons, they dont have any mass, but theyre there.

I can certainly answer you this.

Yes you would still have the perfect vacuum. Photons have no mass to affect the vacuum with.

HTH

LeGrande.


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 PostPost subject: Re: 2 Physic questions        Posted: Sun Aug 02, 2009 7:09 pm 
Quote:
I can certainly answer you this.

Yes you would still have the perfect vacuum. Photons have no mass to affect the vacuum with.

HTH

LeGrande.



Well, yes, I thought so too, but it isnt empty anyways, or is it? There is something inside, does it really matter if it affects the vacuum?


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 PostPost subject: Re: 2 Physic questions        Posted: Sun Aug 02, 2009 7:48 pm 
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Namronia wrote:
Well, Ive got 2 questions to physic, that nobody could answer me yet.

The first one...

Imagine, you have a perfect vacuum, with really NOTHING inside in a glass box, and you shoot light through it, is it still a perfect vacuum? I mean, there is something inside then, photons, they dont have any mass, but theyre there.


The 2nd one...

Why are big masses attract each other? Yes, Einstein said it was a bending in spacetime, quantumtheory says its gravitons hidden somewhere in weird higgs-bosons and Newton said something very different. But it doesnt matter which one is right, of if anyone of these are right, or if I missunderstood them at all, is there a just very easy explanation why they behave like that? I mean, ... lets say...
- = vacuum (space)
s = sun
e = earth

s--------------------------------------e

Theres nothing that could carry the gravity, if spacetime is bent, thats different of course, but its still not really easy to understand for me.

Can someone explain those things for me? Ive asked a lot of different persons in different forums, but everybody says, at least to the 2nd one, there is no clear answer. I dont really believe that.

Thanks

For the first one :
There is no perfect vacuum, but for your question If you shoot light through a glass box with perfect vacuum it will not be perfect vacuum anymore
Vacuum means (in terms of quantum mechanics) that there are NO particals in the given space, when you shoot light through this vacuum, particles (in this case photons) go through the the vacuum and for a VERRRRRRRRRY short moment the perfect vacuum isnt perfect anymore

Sorry for my messy explaination :mrgreen:
For the second one :
My knowlege does not reach this far at the moment.


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 PostPost subject: Re: 2 Physic questions        Posted: Sun Aug 02, 2009 8:39 pm 
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For the second one, it sounds like you're trying to explain what causes gravity. Well. I haven't see anything that's accepted as fact as to what causes gravity, we just know it exists.

I don't understand what a vacuum has to do with anything. Why does something have to "carry" the force. Does something carry a force induced by a magnetic field? Is there some type of invisible contact that we can't see. I would have to say no. I personally view Gravity similar to a magnet. We can't see a magnetic field, but we know it can induce a force onto metals. The thing with gravity, is we don't know what induces it.

Also, it's not just "big masses" that are attracted to each other. It's any mass. We're attracted to Earth, and relative to the Earth, we're small, and the Earth is attracted to us.

But as to why? If you can answer that, I think you'd be eligible for a Nobel Prize.


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 PostPost subject: Re: 2 Physic questions        Posted: Sun Aug 02, 2009 8:58 pm 
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#1 Definition problem - perfect vaccum is a term that demands qualification. Is it a perfect vaccum according to Aristotle's physx, Maxwell's or in regards to QCD? You can't really answer this question without some more qualification. I hesitate to comment on QCD because, besides not having enough quantum under my belt, the computer i'm at right now blocks "hardon" :D. But if I had to bet its not a perfect vaccum because bosons still count as things - certainly Z0 would be counted.

#2 This is actually a hot topic in science, because gravitons have not only not been found but there is a lot of lively debate about their nuances. Its much less a hot topic if your talking about electrical attraction. The trick to force attractions is that the conservation of momentum and mass and to my knowledge everything can be "broken" for a very short period of time. This break in conservation could involves shooting a "virtual" particle (or not shooting the particle or even transcending time and recieving a particle) that sends the other particle in the opposite direction and transfers its momentum to the one it hit - thus causing an repulsive force. Its important to note that the bigger the particle group the more it can send out and the stronger the force.

The fun thing with all this is that with modern physics, this effect is predicted by looking at various probabilities - the attractive nature is a thing beyond classical visualization (unless this includes reading graphs...). The attractive effect using the model of balls being thrown back and forth arrises from having a negetive value in the equation that calculates the interaction. The attractive tendency is almost taken as implicity understanding because of the equations. If you want to understand the equations then consider reading Feyman :) .

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